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C++ Programming Code Examples

C++ > Algorithms Code Examples

Read Text Files

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/* Read Text Files */ void main() { char pcMyLines[10000]; ReadLines("C:\\MyTestFile.txt", 10, 5, pcMyLines, 12345); } // This function reads n lines from a file // Returns the amount of bytes read int ReadLines(const char *pcFile, const int iStartLine, const int iTotLines, char *pcBuffer, const int iBufLen) { FILE *fSrc; int iLines = 0, j, iPos, iByteCount = 0; // Try to open the file if(fSrc = fopen(pcFile, "r")) { // Try to locate the starting line if(iPos = GetLinePos(fSrc, iStartLine)) { // Set the starting position if(!fseek(fSrc, iPos, SEEK_SET)) { // Read the lines for(iLines=0;iLines<iTotLines;iLines++) { // Read the line if((j = ReadLine(fSrc, iPos, pcBuffer, iBufLen - iByteCount)) == -1) break; iByteCount += j; } } } // Close the file fclose(fSrc); } // Return the amount of bytes in the buffer, or -1 for failure return iLines == iTotLines ? iByteCount : -1; } // This function reads a single line from a file int ReadLine(FILE *fSrc, const int iStartPos, char *pcBuffer, const int iBufLen) { int iCount = 0; // Set the starting position if(!fseek(fSrc, iStartPos, SEEK_SET)) { // Keep reading characters while we can while(!feof(fSrc) && (iCount < iBufLen)) { // Read the character pcBuffer[iCount] = (char)fgetc(fSrc); if(pcBuffer[iCount++] == '\n') break; } } else iCount = -1; return iCount; } // This function locates a line in a file // Returns the position of the line in the file int GetLinePos(FILE *fSrc, const int iLine, const int iStartPos /* 0 */) { char pcBuffer[4096]; int i, iPos = 0, iLines = 0, iBytes; // Set the start position if(!fseek(fSrc, iStartPos, SEEK_SET)) { // Read the (next) block of data while(iBytes = fread(pcBuffer, sizeof(char), 4096, fSrc)) { // Go through the block for(i=0;i<iBytes;i++) { // Do we have a new line? if(pcBuffer[i] == '\n') { // Update the line count iLines++; // Have we reached the desired line? if(iLines == iLine) { // Store the position iPos += i; break; } } } // Update the position iPos += iBytes; } } // Return the position of the line in the file, or -1 for failure return iLines == iLine ? iPos : -1; }
If Else Statement in C++
In computer programming, we use the if statement to run a block code only when a certain condition is met. An if statement can be followed by an optional else statement, which executes when the boolean expression is false. There are three forms of if...else statements in C++: • if statement, • if...else statement, • if...else if...else statement,
Syntax for If Statement in C++
if (condition) { // body of if statement }
The if statement evaluates the condition inside the parentheses ( ). If the condition evaluates to true, the code inside the body of if is executed. If the condition evaluates to false, the code inside the body of if is skipped.
Syntax for If...Else Statement
if (condition) { // block of code if condition is true } else { // block of code if condition is false }
The if..else statement evaluates the condition inside the parenthesis. If the condition evaluates true, the code inside the body of if is executed, the code inside the body of else is skipped from execution. If the condition evaluates false, the code inside the body of else is executed, the code inside the body of if is skipped from execution. The if...else statement is used to execute a block of code among two alternatives. However, if we need to make a choice between more than two alternatives, we use the if...else if...else statement.
Syntax for If...Else...Else If Statement in C++
if (condition1) { // code block 1 } else if (condition2){ // code block 2 } else { // code block 3 }
• If condition1 evaluates to true, the code block 1 is executed. • If condition1 evaluates to false, then condition2 is evaluated. • If condition2 is true, the code block 2 is executed. • If condition2 is false, the code block 3 is executed. There can be more than one else if statement but only one if and else statements. In C/C++ if-else-if ladder helps user decide from among multiple options. The C/C++ if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the C else-if ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
Syntax for If Else If Ladder in C++
if (condition) statement 1; else if (condition) statement 2; . . else statement;
Working of the if-else-if ladder: 1. Control falls into the if block. 2. The flow jumps to Condition 1. 3. Condition is tested. If Condition yields true, goto Step 4. If Condition yields false, goto Step 5. 4. The present block is executed. Goto Step 7. 5. The flow jumps to Condition 2. If Condition yields true, goto step 4. If Condition yields false, goto Step 6. 6. The flow jumps to Condition 3. If Condition yields true, goto step 4. If Condition yields false, execute else block. Goto Step 7. 7. Exits the if-else-if ladder. • The if else ladder statement in C++ programming language is used to check set of conditions in sequence. • This is useful when we want to selectively executes one code block(out of many) based on certain conditions. • It allows us to check for multiple condition expressions and execute different code blocks for more than two conditions. • A condition expression is tested only when all previous if conditions in if-else ladder is false. • If any of the conditional expression evaluates to true, then it will execute the corresponding code block and exits whole if-else ladder.
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/* If Else Statement in C++ Language */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main () { // local variable declaration: int a = 100; // check the boolean condition if( a < 20 ) { // if condition is true then print the following cout << "a is less than 20;" << endl; } else { // if condition is false then print the following cout << "a is not less than 20;" << endl; } cout << "value of a is : " << a << endl; return 0; }
fseek() Function in C++
Reposition stream position indicator. Sets the position indicator associated with the stream to a new position. For streams open in binary mode, the new position is defined by adding offset to a reference position specified by origin. For streams open in text mode, offset shall either be zero or a value returned by a previous call to ftell, and origin shall necessarily be SEEK_SET. If the function is called with other values for these arguments, support depends on the particular system and library implementation (non-portable). The end-of-file internal indicator of the stream is cleared after a successful call to this function, and all effects from previous calls to ungetc on this stream are dropped. On streams open for update (read+write), a call to fseek allows to switch between reading and writing.
Syntax for fseek() Function in C++
#include <cstdio> int fseek ( FILE * stream, long int offset, int origin );
stream
Pointer to a FILE object that identifies the stream.
offset
Binary files: Number of bytes to offset from origin. Text files: Either zero, or a value returned by ftell.
origin
Position used as reference for the offset. It is specified by one of the following constants defined in <cstdio> exclusively to be used as arguments for this function: • SEEK_SET Beginning of file • SEEK_CUR Current position of the file pointer • SEEK_END End of file * * Library implementations are allowed to not meaningfully support SEEK_END (therefore, code using it has no real standard portability). If successful, the function returns zero. Otherwise, it returns non-zero value. If a read or write error occurs, the error indicator (ferror) is set.
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/* fseek() in C language, is use to move file pointer to a specific position. Offset and stream are the destination of pointer, is given in the function parameters. If successful, it returns zero. If it is not successful, it returns non-zero value. */ /* Reposition stream position indicator by fseek() function code example */ #include <cstdio> int main() { FILE* fp = fopen("example.txt","w+"); char ch; fputs("Erica 25 Berlin", fp); rewind(fp); printf("Name: "); while((ch=fgetc(fp))!=' ') putchar(ch); putchar('\n'); printf("Age: "); fseek(fp,10,SEEK_SET); while((ch=fgetc(fp))!=' ') putchar(ch); putchar('\n'); printf("City: "); fseek(fp,15,SEEK_SET); while((ch=fgetc(fp))!=EOF) putchar(ch); putchar('\n'); fclose(fp); return 0; }
Logical Operators in C++
Logical Operators are used to compare and connect two or more expressions or variables, such that the value of the expression is completely dependent on the original expression or value or variable. We use logical operators to check whether an expression is true or false. If the expression is true, it returns 1 whereas if the expression is false, it returns 0. Assume variable A holds 1 and variable B holds 0:
&&
Called Logical AND operator. If both the operands are non-zero, then condition becomes true. (A && B) is false. The logical AND operator && returns true - if and only if all the operands are true. false - if one or more operands are false.
||
Called Logical OR Operator. If any of the two operands is non-zero, then condition becomes true. (A || B) is true. The logical OR operator || returns true - if one or more of the operands are true. false - if and only if all the operands are false.
!
Called Logical NOT Operator. Use to reverses the logical state of its operand. If a condition is true, then Logical NOT operator will make false. !(A && B) is true. The logical NOT operator ! is a unary operator i.e. it takes only one operand. It returns true when the operand is false, and false when the operand is true.
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/* The operator ! is the C++ operator for the Boolean operation NOT. It has only one operand, to its right, and inverts it, producing false if its operand is true, and true if its operand is false. Basically, it returns the opposite Boolean value of evaluating its operand. The logical operators && and || are used when evaluating two expressions to obtain a single relational result. The operator && corresponds to the Boolean logical operation AND, which yields true if both its operands are true, and false otherwise. */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; main() { int a = 5; int b = 20; int c ; if(a && b) { cout << "Line 1 - Condition is true"<< endl ; } if(a || b) { cout << "Line 2 - Condition is true"<< endl ; } /* Let's change the values of a and b */ a = 0; b = 10; if(a && b) { cout << "Line 3 - Condition is true"<< endl ; } else { cout << "Line 4 - Condition is not true"<< endl ; } if(!(a && b)) { cout << "Line 5 - Condition is true"<< endl ; } return 0; }
fclose() Function in C++
Close file. Closes the file associated with the stream and disassociates it. Closes the given file stream. Any unwritten buffered data are flushed to the OS. Any unread buffered data are discarded. Whether or not the operation succeeds, the stream is no longer associated with a file, and the buffer allocated by std::setbuf or std::setvbuf, if any, is also disassociated and deallocated if automatic allocation was used. All internal buffers associated with the stream are disassociated from it and flushed: the content of any unwritten output buffer is written and the content of any unread input buffer is discarded. Even if the call fails, the stream passed as parameter will no longer be associated with the file nor its buffers.
Syntax for fclose() Function in C++
#include <cstdio> int fclose ( FILE * stream );
stream
Pointer to a FILE object that specifies the stream to be closed. If the stream is successfully closed, a zero value is returned. On failure, EOF is returned.
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/* The fclose() function takes a single argument, a file stream which is to be closed. All the data that are buffered but not written are flushed to the OS and all unread buffered data are discarded. Even if the operation fails, the stream is no longer associated with the file. If the file pointer is used after fclose() is executed, the behaviour is undefined. */ /* Close file by fclose() function code example */ #include <iostream> #include <cstdio> using namespace std; int main() { FILE *fp; fp = fopen("file.txt","w"); char str[20] = "Hello World!"; if (fp == NULL) { cout << "Error opening file"; exit(1); } fprintf(fp,"%s",str); fclose(fp); cout << "File closed successfully"; return 0; }
line() Function in C++
The header file graphics.h contains line() function which is used to draw a line from a point(x1, y1) to point(x2, y2) i.e. (x1, y1) and (x2, y2) are end points of the line. The function line() draws a line on the graphics screen between two specified points. So this function requires four parameters namely x1, y1, x2, and y2 to represent two points. This function draws a line from (x1, y1) coordinates to (x2, y2) coordinates on the graphics screen.
Syntax for line() Function in C++
void line(int x1, int y1, int x2, int y2);
x1
X coordinate of first point
y1
Y coordinate of first point.
x2
X coordinate of second point.
y2
Y coordinate of second point. You can change "linestyle", "pattern", "thickness" of the line by setlinestyle() function.
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/* draw a line in C++ graphic code example */ #include<iostream.h> #include<conio.h> #include<graphics.h> void main() { int gd=DETECT,gm,x,y; clrscr(); initgraph(&gd,&gm,"c:\\TC\\bgi"); //INITIALISING GRAPHICS MODE setlinestyle(0,0,3); outtextxy(300,150,"LINE()"); line(350,60,200,200); outtextxy(300,300," CURRENT POSITION"); linerel(320,350); outtextxy(335,315,"LINEREL()"); outtextxy(30,30," CURRENT POSITION"); lineto(30,200); outtextxy(70,45,"LINETO()"); getch(); closegraph(); }
IOS Library eof() Function in C++
Check whether eofbit is set. Returns true if the eofbit error state flag is set for the stream. This flag is set by all standard input operations when the End-of-File is reached in the sequence associated with the stream. Note that the value returned by this function depends on the last operation performed on the stream (and not on the next). Operations that attempt to read at the End-of-File fail, and thus both the eofbit and the failbit end up set. This function can be used to check whether the failure is due to reaching the End-of-File or to some other reason.
Syntax for IOS eof() Function in C++
bool eof() const;
This function does not accept any parameter. Function returns true if the stream's eofbit error state flag is set (which signals that the End-of-File has been reached by the last input operation). false otherwise.
Data races
Accesses the stream object. Concurrent access to the same stream object may cause data races.
Exception safety
Strong guarantee: if an exception is thrown, there are no changes in the stream.
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/* The eof() method of ios class in C++ is used to check if the stream is has raised any EOF (End Of File) error. It means that this function will check if this stream has its eofbit set. */ // C++ code example to demonstrate the working of eof() function #include <iostream> #include <fstream> int main () { std::ifstream is("example.txt"); char c; while (is.get(c)) std::cout << c; if (is.eof()) std::cout << "[EoF reached]\n"; else std::cout << "[error reading]\n"; is.close(); return 0; }
sizeof() Operator in C++
The sizeof() is an operator that evaluates the size of data type, constants, variable. It is a compile-time operator as it returns the size of any variable or a constant at the compilation time. The size, which is calculated by the sizeof() operator, is the amount of RAM occupied in the computer. The sizeof is a keyword, but it is a compile-time operator that determines the size, in bytes, of a variable or data type. The sizeof operator can be used to get the size of classes, structures, unions and any other user defined data type.
Syntax for sizeof() Operator in C++
sizeof(data_type);
data_type
data type whose size is to be calculated The data_type can be the data type of the data, variables, constants, unions, structures, or any other user-defined data type. If the parameter of a sizeof() operator contains the data type of a variable, then the sizeof() operator will return the size of the data type. sizeof() may give different output according to machine, we have run our program on 32 bit gcc compiler.
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/* The sizeof() is an operator in C and C++. It is an unary operator which assists a programmer in finding the size of the operand which is being used. */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int arr[]={10,20,30,40,50}; std::cout << "Size of the array 'arr' is : "<<sizeof(arr) << std::endl; cout << "Size of char : " << sizeof(char) << endl; cout << "Size of int : " << sizeof(int) << endl; cout << "Size of short int : " << sizeof(short int) << endl; cout << "Size of long int : " << sizeof(long int) << endl; cout << "Size of float : " << sizeof(float) << endl; cout << "Size of double : " << sizeof(double) << endl; cout << "Size of wchar_t : " << sizeof(wchar_t) << endl; return 0; }
read() Function in C++
Read block of data. Extracts n characters from the stream and stores them in the array pointed to by s. This function simply copies a block of data, without checking its contents nor appending a null character at the end. If the input sequence runs out of characters to extract (i.e., the end-of-file is reached) before n characters have been successfully read, the array pointed to by s contains all the characters read until that point, and both the eofbit and failbit flags are set for the stream. Internally, the function accesses the input sequence by first constructing a sentry object (with noskipws set to true). Then (if good), it extracts characters from its associated stream buffer object as if calling its member functions sbumpc or sgetc, and finally destroys the sentry object before returning. The number of characters successfully read and stored by this function can be accessed by calling member gcount.
Syntax for read() Function in C++
#include <fstream> istream& read (char* s, streamsize n);
s
Pointer to an array where the extracted characters are stored.
n
Number of characters to extract. streamsize is a signed integral type. Function returns the istream object (*this). Errors are signaled by modifying the internal state flags: • eofbit: The function stopped extracting characters because the input sequence has no more characters available (end-of-file reached). • failbit: Either the function could not extract n characters or the construction of sentry failed. • badbit: Error on stream (such as when this function catches an exception thrown by an internal operation). When set, the integrity of the stream may have been affected. Multiple flags may be set by a single operation. If the operation sets an internal state flag that was registered with member exceptions, the function throws an exception of member type failure.
Data races
Modifies the elements in the array pointed to by s and the stream object. Concurrent access to the same stream object may cause data races, except for the standard stream object cin when this is synchronized with stdio (in this case, no data races are initiated, although no guarantees are given on the order in which extracted characters are attributed to threads).
Exception safety
Basic guarantee: if an exception is thrown, the object is in a valid state. It throws an exception of member type failure if the resulting error state flag is not goodbit and member exceptions was set to throw for that state. Any exception thrown by an internal operation is caught and handled by the function, setting badbit. If badbit was set on the last call to exceptions, the function rethrows the caught exception.
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/* The function read() in <iostream> header file extracts n characters from the stream and stores them in the array pointed to the stream. Unlike functions put() and get() it is usually used to handle the data in binary form. */ /* extracts n characters from the stream and stores them in the array pointed by s with read() function code example. */ #include <iostream> #include <fstream> int main () { std::ifstream is ("test.txt", std::ifstream::binary); if (is) { is.seekg (0, is.end); int length = is.tellg(); is.seekg (0, is.beg); char * buffer = new char [length]; std::cout << "Reading " << length << " characters... "; is.read (buffer,length); if (is) std::cout << "all characters read successfully."; else std::cout << "error: only " << is.gcount() << " could be read"; is.close(); delete[] buffer; } return 0; }
Break Statement in C++
Break statement in C++ is a loop control statement defined using the break keyword. It is used to stop the current execution and proceed with the next one. When a compiler calls the break statement, it immediately stops the execution of the loop and transfers the control outside the loop and executes the other statements. In the case of a nested loop, break the statement stops the execution of the inner loop and proceeds with the outer loop. The statement itself says it breaks the loop. When the break statement is called in the program, it immediately terminates the loop and transfers the flow control to the statement mentioned outside the loop.
Syntax for Break Statement in C++
// jump-statement; break;
The break statement is used in the following scenario: • When a user is not sure about the number of iterations in the program. • When a user wants to stop the program based on some condition. The break statement terminates the loop where it is defined and execute the other. If the condition is mentioned in the program, based on the condition, it executes the loop. If the condition is true, it executes the conditional statement, and if the break statement is mentioned, it will immediately break the program. otherwise, the loop will iterate until the given condition fails. if the condition is false, it stops the program.
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/* break statement with while loop code example */ // program to find the sum of positive numbers // if the user enters a negative numbers, break ends the loop // the negative number entered is not added to sum #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int number; int sum = 0; while (true) { // take input from the user cout << "Enter a number: "; cin >> number; // break condition if (number < 0) { break; } // add all positive numbers sum += number; } // display the sum cout << "The sum is " << sum << endl; return 0; }
For Loop Statement in C++
In computer programming, loops are used to repeat a block of code. For example, when you are displaying number from 1 to 100 you may want set the value of a variable to 1 and display it 100 times, increasing its value by 1 on each loop iteration. When you know exactly how many times you want to loop through a block of code, use the for loop instead of a while loop. A for loop is a repetition control structure that allows you to efficiently write a loop that needs to execute a specific number of times.
Syntax of For Loop Statement in C++
for (initialization; condition; update) { // body of-loop }
initialization
initializes variables and is executed only once.
condition
if true, the body of for loop is executed, if false, the for loop is terminated.
update
updates the value of initialized variables and again checks the condition. A new range-based for loop was introduced to work with collections such as arrays and vectors.
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/* For Loop Statement in C++ Language */ // C++ program to find the sum of first n natural numbers // positive integers such as 1,2,3,...n are known as natural numbers #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int num, sum; sum = 0; cout << "Enter a positive integer: "; cin >> num; for (int i = 1; i <= num; ++i) { sum += i; } cout << "Sum = " << sum << endl; return 0; }
While Loop Statement in C++
In while loop, condition is evaluated first and if it returns true then the statements inside while loop execute, this happens repeatedly until the condition returns false. When condition returns false, the control comes out of loop and jumps to the next statement in the program after while loop. The important point to note when using while loop is that we need to use increment or decrement statement inside while loop so that the loop variable gets changed on each iteration, and at some point condition returns false. This way we can end the execution of while loop otherwise the loop would execute indefinitely. A while loop that never stops is said to be the infinite while loop, when we give the condition in such a way so that it never returns false, then the loops becomes infinite and repeats itself indefinitely.
Syntax for While Loop Statement in C++
while (condition) { // body of the loop }
• A while loop evaluates the condition • If the condition evaluates to true, the code inside the while loop is executed. • The condition is evaluated again. • This process continues until the condition is false. • When the condition evaluates to false, the loop terminates. Do not forget to increase the variable used in the condition, otherwise the loop will never end!
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/* While Loop Statement in C++ language */ // program to find the sum of positive numbers // if the user enters a negative number, the loop ends // the negative number entered is not added to the sum #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int number; int sum = 0; // take input from the user cout << "Enter a number: "; cin >> number; while (number >= 0) { // add all positive numbers sum += number; // take input again if the number is positive cout << "Enter a number: "; cin >> number; } // display the sum cout << "\nThe sum is " << sum << endl; return 0; }
Nested Loop Statement in C++
C supports nesting of loops in C. Nesting of loops is the feature in C that allows the looping of statements inside another loop. Any number of loops can be defined inside another loop, i.e., there is no restriction for defining any number of loops. The nesting level can be defined at n times. You can define any type of loop inside another loop; for example, you can define 'while' loop inside a 'for' loop. A loop inside another loop is called a nested loop. The depth of nested loop depends on the complexity of a problem. We can have any number of nested loops as required. Consider a nested loop where the outer loop runs n times and consists of another loop inside it. The inner loop runs m times. Then, the total number of times the inner loop runs during the program execution is n*m.
Syntax for Nested Loop Statement in C++
Outer_loop { Inner_loop { // inner loop statements. } // outer loop statements. }
Outer_loop and Inner_loop are the valid loops that can be a 'for' loop, 'while' loop or 'do-while' loop.
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/* nested loop statement in C++ language */ // C++ program that uses nested for loop to print a 2D matrix #include <bits/stdc++.h> using namespace std; #define ROW 3 #define COL 3 // Driver program int main() { int i, j; // Declare the matrix int matrix[ROW][COL] = { { 4, 8, 12 }, { 16, 20, 24 }, { 28, 32, 36 } }; cout << "Given matrix is \n"; // Print the matrix using nested loops for (i = 0; i < ROW; i++) { for (j = 0; j < COL; j++) cout << matrix[i][j]; cout << "\n"; } return 0; }
If Else If Ladder in C/C++
The if...else statement executes two different codes depending upon whether the test expression is true or false. Sometimes, a choice has to be made from more than 2 possibilities. The if...else ladder allows you to check between multiple test expressions and execute different statements. In C/C++ if-else-if ladder helps user decide from among multiple options. The C/C++ if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the C else-if ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
Syntax of if...else Ladder in C++
if (Condition1) { Statement1; } else if(Condition2) { Statement2; } . . . else if(ConditionN) { StatementN; } else { Default_Statement; }
In the above syntax of if-else-if, if the Condition1 is TRUE then the Statement1 will be executed and control goes to next statement in the program following if-else-if ladder. If Condition1 is FALSE then Condition2 will be checked, if Condition2 is TRUE then Statement2 will be executed and control goes to next statement in the program following if-else-if ladder. Similarly, if Condition2 is FALSE then next condition will be checked and the process continues. If all the conditions in the if-else-if ladder are evaluated to FALSE, then Default_Statement will be executed.
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/* write a C program which demonstrate use of if-else-if ladder statement */ /* Program to Print Day Names using Else If Ladder in C++*/ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int day; cout << "Enter Day Number: "; cin >> day; cout << "Day is "; if (day == 1) cout << "Sunday" << endl; else if (day == 2) cout << "Monday" << endl; else if (day == 3) cout << "Tuesday" << endl; else if (day == 4) cout << "Wednesday" << endl; else if (day == 5) cout << "Thursday" << endl; else if (day == 6) cout << "Friday" << endl; else cout << "Saturday" << endl; return 0; }
main() Function in C++
A program shall contain a global function named main, which is the designated start of the program in hosted environment. main() function is the entry point of any C++ program. It is the point at which execution of program is started. When a C++ program is executed, the execution control goes directly to the main() function. Every C++ program have a main() function.
Syntax for main() Function in C++
void main() { ............ ............ }
void
void is a keyword in C++ language, void means nothing, whenever we use void as a function return type then that function nothing return. here main() function no return any value.
main
main is a name of function which is predefined function in C++ library. In place of void we can also use int return type of main() function, at that time main() return integer type value. 1) It cannot be used anywhere in the program a) in particular, it cannot be called recursively b) its address cannot be taken 2) It cannot be predefined and cannot be overloaded: effectively, the name main in the global namespace is reserved for functions (although it can be used to name classes, namespaces, enumerations, and any entity in a non-global namespace, except that a function called "main" cannot be declared with C language linkage in any namespace). 3) It cannot be defined as deleted or (since C++11) declared with C language linkage, constexpr (since C++11), consteval (since C++20), inline, or static. 4) The body of the main function does not need to contain the return statement: if control reaches the end of main without encountering a return statement, the effect is that of executing return 0;. 5) Execution of the return (or the implicit return upon reaching the end of main) is equivalent to first leaving the function normally (which destroys the objects with automatic storage duration) and then calling std::exit with the same argument as the argument of the return. (std::exit then destroys static objects and terminates the program). 6) (since C++14) The return type of the main function cannot be deduced (auto main() {... is not allowed). 7) (since C++20) The main function cannot be a coroutine.
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/* simple code example by main() function in C++ */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int day = 4; switch (day) { case 1: cout << "Monday"; break; case 2: cout << "Tuesday"; break; case 3: cout << "Wednesday"; break; case 4: cout << "Thursday"; break; case 5: cout << "Friday"; break; case 6: cout << "Saturday"; break; case 7: cout << "Sunday"; break; } return 0; }
Assignment Operators in C++
As the name already suggests, these operators help in assigning values to variables. These operators help us in allocating a particular value to the operands. The main simple assignment operator is '='. We have to be sure that both the left and right sides of the operator must have the same data type. We have different levels of operators. Assignment operators are used to assign the value, variable and function to another variable. Assignment operators in C are some of the C Programming Operator, which are useful to assign the values to the declared variables. Let's discuss the various types of the assignment operators such as =, +=, -=, /=, *= and %=. The following table lists the assignment operators supported by the C language:
=
Simple assignment operator. Assigns values from right side operands to left side operand
+=
Add AND assignment operator. It adds the right operand to the left operand and assign the result to the left operand.
-=
Subtract AND assignment operator. It subtracts the right operand from the left operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
*=
Multiply AND assignment operator. It multiplies the right operand with the left operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
/=
Divide AND assignment operator. It divides the left operand with the right operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
%=
Modulus AND assignment operator. It takes modulus using two operands and assigns the result to the left operand.
<<=
Left shift AND assignment operator.
>>=
Right shift AND assignment operator.
&=
Bitwise AND assignment operator.
^=
Bitwise exclusive OR and assignment operator.
|=
Bitwise inclusive OR and assignment operator.
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/* Assignment operators are used to assigning value to a variable. The left side operand of the assignment operator is a variable and right side operand of the assignment operator is a value. The value on the right side must be of the same data-type of the variable on the left side otherwise the compiler will raise an error. */ // C++ program to demonstrate working of Assignment operators #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { // Assigning value 10 to a // using "=" operator int a = 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by adding 10 to a // using "+=" operator a += 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by subtracting 10 from a // using "-=" operator a -= 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by multiplying 10 to a // using "*=" operator a *= 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by dividing 10 from a // using "/=" operator a /= 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; return 0; }


To declare such a function, precede its name with * and &. In the body of the function, you can do whatever is appropriate. An important rule with this type of "function" is that it must
#include: This statements tells the compiler to include iostream file. This file contains pre defined "input/output functions" that we can use in our program. Comments as the names