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C++ Programming Code Examples

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Types of variables in C++ programming

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/* Types of variables in C++ programming Variables can be categorised based on their data type. For example, in the above example we have seen integer types variables. Following are the types of variables available in C++. */ int: These type of of variables holds integer value. char: holds character value like 'j', 'X', 'r', 'p', 'q' etc. bool: holds boolean value true or false. double: double-precision floating point value. float: Single-precision floating point value.
Comments in C++
The C++ comments are statements that are not executed by the compiler. The comments in C++ programming can be used to provide explanation of the code, variable, method or class. If we write comments on our code, it will be easier for us to understand the code in the future. Also, it will be easier for your fellow developers to understand the code. By the help of comments, you can hide the program code also. There are two types of comments in C++: • Single Line comment • Multi Line comment
Syntax for Single Line Comment in C++
/* This is a comment */
The single line comment starts with // (double slash).
Syntax for Multi Line Comment in C++
/* C++ comments can also * span multiple lines */
C++ multi line comment is used to comment multiple lines of code. It is surrounded by slash and asterisk (/* ..... */). Comments shouldn't be the substitute for a way to explain poorly written code in English. We should always write well-structured and self-explanatory code. And, then use comments.
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/* program to illustrate use comments in C++ language */ #include <ostream> using namespace std; int main() { int x = 11; // x is a variable cout<<x<<"\n"; /* declare and print variable in C++ */ int x = 35; cout<<x<<"\n"; // This is a comment cout << "Hello World!"; /* Multi-line Comments in C++ */ }
Standard Input Stream (cin) in C++
The cin object is used to accept input from the standard input device i.e. keyboard. It is defined in the iostream header file. C++ cin statement is the instance of the class istream and is used to read input from the standard input device which is usually a keyboard. The extraction operator(>>) is used along with the object cin for reading inputs. The extraction operator extracts the data from the object cin which is entered using the keyboard.
Syntax for Standard Input Stream (cin) in C++
cin >> var_name;
>>
is the extraction operator.
var_name
is usually a variable, but can also be an element of containers like arrays, vectors, lists, etc. The "c" in cin refers to "character" and "in" means "input". Hence cin means "character input". The cin object is used along with the extraction operator >> in order to receive a stream of characters. The >> operator can also be used more than once in the same statement to accept multiple inputs. The cin object can also be used with other member functions such as getline(), read(), etc. Some of the commonly used member functions are: • cin.get(char &ch): Reads an input character and stores it in ch. • cin.getline(char *buffer, int length): Reads a stream of characters into the string buffer, It stops when: it has read length-1 characters or when it finds an end-of-line character '\n' or the end of the file eof. • cin.read(char *buffer, int n): Reads n bytes (or until the end of the file) from the stream into the buffer. • cin.ignore(int n): Ignores the next n characters from the input stream. • cin.eof(): Returns a non-zero value if the end of file (eof) is reached. The prototype of cin as defined in the iostream header file is: extern istream cin; The cin object in C++ is an object of class istream. It is associated with the standard C input stream stdin. The cin object is ensured to be initialized during or before the first time an object of type ios_base::Init is constructed. After the cin object is constructed, cin.tie() returns &cout. This means that any formatted input operation on cin forces a call to cout.flush() if any characters are pending for output.
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/* Standard Input Stream (cin) in C++ language */ // cin with Member Functions #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { char name[20], address[20]; cout << "Name: "; // use cin with getline() cin.getline(name, 20); cout << "Address: "; cin.getline(address, 20); cout << endl << "You entered " << endl; cout << "Name = " << name << endl; cout << "Address = " << address; return 0; }
Standard Output Stream (cout) in C++
The cout is a predefined object of ostream class. It is connected with the standard output device, which is usually a display screen. The cout is used in conjunction with stream insertion operator (<<) to display the output on a console. On most program environments, the standard output by default is the screen, and the C++ stream object defined to access it is cout.
Syntax for cout in C++
cout << var_name; //or cout << "Some String";
The syntax of the cout object in C++: cout << var_name; Or cout << "Some String";
<<
is the insertion operator
var_name
is usually a variable, but can also be an array element or elements of containers like vectors, lists, maps, etc. The "c" in cout refers to "character" and "out" means "output". Hence cout means "character output". The cout object is used along with the insertion operator << in order to display a stream of characters. The << operator can be used more than once with a combination of variables, strings, and manipulators. cout is used for displaying data on the screen. The operator << called as insertion operator or put to operator. The Insertion operator can be overloaded. Insertion operator is similar to the printf() operation in C. cout is the object of ostream class. Data flow direction is from variable to output device. Multiple outputs can be displayed using cout.
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/* standard output stream (cout) in C++ language */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { string str = "Do not interrupt me"; char ch = 'm'; // use cout with write() cout.write(str,6); cout << endl; // use cout with put() cout.put(ch); return 0; }


In C++, a namespace ("the name scope") is an abstract container or environment created to hold a logical grouping of "unique identifiers" or symbols (i.e., names). An identifier defined