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C++ Programming Code Examples

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Array class for 10 int value with overloaded functions: +, -, ==

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/* Array class for 10 int value with overloaded functions: +, -, == */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; class array { int nums[10]; public: array(); void set(int n[10]); void show(); array operator+(array object2); array operator-(array object2); int operator==(array object2); }; array::array() { int i; for(i = 0; i <10; i++) nums[ i ] = 0; } void array::set(int *n) { int i; for(i = 0; i <10; i++) nums[ i ] = n[ i ]; } void array::show() { int i; for(i = 0; i <10; i++) cout << nums[ i ] << ' '; cout << endl; } array array::operator+(array object2) { int i; array temp; for(i = 0; i <10; i++) temp.nums[ i ] = nums[ i ] + object2.nums[ i ]; return temp; } array array::operator-(array object2) { int i; array temp; for(i = 0; i <10; i++) temp.nums[ i ] = nums[ i ] - object2.nums[ i ]; return temp; } int array::operator==(array object2) { int i; for(i = 0; i <10; i++) if(nums[ i ]!=object2.nums[ i ]) return 0; return 1; } int main() { array object1, object2, object3; int i[10] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 }; object1.set(i); object2.set(i); object3 = object1 + object2; object3.show(); object3 = object1 - object3; object3.show(); if(object1==object2) cout << "object1 equals object2\n"; else cout << "object1 does not equal object2\n"; if(object1==object3) cout << "object1 equals object3\n"; else cout << "object1 does not equal object3\n"; return 0; }
Namespaces in C++ Language
Consider a situation, when we have two persons with the same name, jhon, in the same class. Whenever we need to differentiate them definitely we would have to use some additional information along with their name, like either the area, if they live in different area or their mother's or father's name, etc. Same situation can arise in your C++ applications. For example, you might be writing some code that has a function called xyz() and there is another library available which is also having same function xyz(). Now the compiler has no way of knowing which version of xyz() function you are referring to within your code. A namespace is designed to overcome this difficulty and is used as additional information to differentiate similar functions, classes, variables etc. with the same name available in different libraries. Using namespace, you can define the context in which names are defined. In essence, a namespace defines a scope.
Defining a Namespace
A namespace definition begins with the keyword namespace followed by the namespace name as follows:
namespace namespace_name { // code declarations }
To call the namespace-enabled version of either function or variable, prepend (::) the namespace name as follows:
name::code; // code could be variable or function.
Using Directive
You can also avoid prepending of namespaces with the using namespace directive. This directive tells the compiler that the subsequent code is making use of names in the specified namespace.
Discontiguous Namespaces
A namespace can be defined in several parts and so a namespace is made up of the sum of its separately defined parts. The separate parts of a namespace can be spread over multiple files. So, if one part of the namespace requires a name defined in another file, that name must still be declared. Writing a following namespace definition either defines a new namespace or adds new elements to an existing one:
namespace namespace_name { // code declarations }
Nested Namespaces
Namespaces can be nested where you can define one namespace inside another name space as follows:
namespace namespace_name1 { // code declarations namespace namespace_name2 { // code declarations } }
• Namespace is a feature added in C++ and not present in C. • A namespace is a declarative region that provides a scope to the identifiers (names of the types, function, variables etc) inside it. • Multiple namespace blocks with the same name are allowed. All declarations within those blocks are declared in the named scope. • Namespace declarations appear only at global scope. • Namespace declarations can be nested within another namespace. • Namespace declarations don't have access specifiers. (Public or private) • No need to give semicolon after the closing brace of definition of namespace. • We can split the definition of namespace over several units.
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/* namespaces in C++ language */ // A C++ code to demonstrate that we can define // methods outside namespace. #include <iostream> using namespace std; // Creating a namespace namespace ns { void display(); class happy { public: void display(); }; } // Defining methods of namespace void ns::happy::display() { cout << "ns::happy::display()\n"; } void ns::display() { cout << "ns::display()\n"; } // Driver code int main() { ns::happy obj; ns::display(); obj.display(); return 0; }
If Else Statement in C++
In computer programming, we use the if statement to run a block code only when a certain condition is met. An if statement can be followed by an optional else statement, which executes when the boolean expression is false. There are three forms of if...else statements in C++: • if statement, • if...else statement, • if...else if...else statement,
Syntax for If Statement in C++
if (condition) { // body of if statement }
The if statement evaluates the condition inside the parentheses ( ). If the condition evaluates to true, the code inside the body of if is executed. If the condition evaluates to false, the code inside the body of if is skipped.
Syntax for If...Else Statement
if (condition) { // block of code if condition is true } else { // block of code if condition is false }
The if..else statement evaluates the condition inside the parenthesis. If the condition evaluates true, the code inside the body of if is executed, the code inside the body of else is skipped from execution. If the condition evaluates false, the code inside the body of else is executed, the code inside the body of if is skipped from execution. The if...else statement is used to execute a block of code among two alternatives. However, if we need to make a choice between more than two alternatives, we use the if...else if...else statement.
Syntax for If...Else...Else If Statement in C++
if (condition1) { // code block 1 } else if (condition2){ // code block 2 } else { // code block 3 }
• If condition1 evaluates to true, the code block 1 is executed. • If condition1 evaluates to false, then condition2 is evaluated. • If condition2 is true, the code block 2 is executed. • If condition2 is false, the code block 3 is executed. There can be more than one else if statement but only one if and else statements. In C/C++ if-else-if ladder helps user decide from among multiple options. The C/C++ if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the C else-if ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
Syntax for If Else If Ladder in C++
if (condition) statement 1; else if (condition) statement 2; . . else statement;
Working of the if-else-if ladder: 1. Control falls into the if block. 2. The flow jumps to Condition 1. 3. Condition is tested. If Condition yields true, goto Step 4. If Condition yields false, goto Step 5. 4. The present block is executed. Goto Step 7. 5. The flow jumps to Condition 2. If Condition yields true, goto step 4. If Condition yields false, goto Step 6. 6. The flow jumps to Condition 3. If Condition yields true, goto step 4. If Condition yields false, execute else block. Goto Step 7. 7. Exits the if-else-if ladder. • The if else ladder statement in C++ programming language is used to check set of conditions in sequence. • This is useful when we want to selectively executes one code block(out of many) based on certain conditions. • It allows us to check for multiple condition expressions and execute different code blocks for more than two conditions. • A condition expression is tested only when all previous if conditions in if-else ladder is false. • If any of the conditional expression evaluates to true, then it will execute the corresponding code block and exits whole if-else ladder.
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/* If Else Statement in C++ Language */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main () { // local variable declaration: int a = 100; // check the boolean condition if( a < 20 ) { // if condition is true then print the following cout << "a is less than 20;" << endl; } else { // if condition is false then print the following cout << "a is not less than 20;" << endl; } cout << "value of a is : " << a << endl; return 0; }
main() Function in C++
A program shall contain a global function named main, which is the designated start of the program in hosted environment. main() function is the entry point of any C++ program. It is the point at which execution of program is started. When a C++ program is executed, the execution control goes directly to the main() function. Every C++ program have a main() function.
Syntax for main() Function in C++
void main() { ............ ............ }
void
void is a keyword in C++ language, void means nothing, whenever we use void as a function return type then that function nothing return. here main() function no return any value.
main
main is a name of function which is predefined function in C++ library. In place of void we can also use int return type of main() function, at that time main() return integer type value. 1) It cannot be used anywhere in the program a) in particular, it cannot be called recursively b) its address cannot be taken 2) It cannot be predefined and cannot be overloaded: effectively, the name main in the global namespace is reserved for functions (although it can be used to name classes, namespaces, enumerations, and any entity in a non-global namespace, except that a function called "main" cannot be declared with C language linkage in any namespace). 3) It cannot be defined as deleted or (since C++11) declared with C language linkage, constexpr (since C++11), consteval (since C++20), inline, or static. 4) The body of the main function does not need to contain the return statement: if control reaches the end of main without encountering a return statement, the effect is that of executing return 0;. 5) Execution of the return (or the implicit return upon reaching the end of main) is equivalent to first leaving the function normally (which destroys the objects with automatic storage duration) and then calling std::exit with the same argument as the argument of the return. (std::exit then destroys static objects and terminates the program). 6) (since C++14) The return type of the main function cannot be deduced (auto main() {... is not allowed). 7) (since C++20) The main function cannot be a coroutine.
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/* simple code example by main() function in C++ */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int day = 4; switch (day) { case 1: cout << "Monday"; break; case 2: cout << "Tuesday"; break; case 3: cout << "Wednesday"; break; case 4: cout << "Thursday"; break; case 5: cout << "Friday"; break; case 6: cout << "Saturday"; break; case 7: cout << "Sunday"; break; } return 0; }
Classes and Objects in C++ Language
The main purpose of C++ programming is to add object orientation to the C programming language and classes are the central feature of C++ that supports object-oriented programming and are often called user-defined types. A class is used to specify the form of an object and it combines data representation and methods for manipulating that data into one neat package. The data and functions within a class are called members of the class.
C++ Class Definitions
When you define a class, you define a blueprint for a data type. This doesn't actually define any data, but it does define what the class name means, that is, what an object of the class will consist of and what operations can be performed on such an object. A class definition starts with the keyword class followed by the class name; and the class body, enclosed by a pair of curly braces. A class definition must be followed either by a semicolon or a list of declarations. For example, we defined the Box data type using the keyword class as follows:
class Box { public: double length; // Length of a box double breadth; // Breadth of a box double height; // Height of a box };
The keyword public determines the access attributes of the members of the class that follows it. A public member can be accessed from outside the class anywhere within the scope of the class object. You can also specify the members of a class as private or protected which we will discuss in a sub-section.
Define C++ Objects
A class provides the blueprints for objects, so basically an object is created from a class. We declare objects of a class with exactly the same sort of declaration that we declare variables of basic types. Following statements declare two objects of class Box:
Box Box1; // Declare Box1 of type Box Box Box2; // Declare Box2 of type Box
Both of the objects Box1 and Box2 will have their own copy of data members.
Accessing the Data Members
The public data members of objects of a class can be accessed using the direct member access operator (.). It is important to note that private and protected members can not be accessed directly using direct member access operator (.).
Classes and Objects in Detail
There are further interesting concepts related to C++ Classes and Objects which we will discuss in various sub-sections listed below: • Class Member Functions: A member function of a class is a function that has its definition or its prototype within the class definition like any other variable. • Class Access Modifiers: A class member can be defined as public, private or protected. By default members would be assumed as private. • Constructor & Destructor: A class constructor is a special function in a class that is called when a new object of the class is created. A destructor is also a special function which is called when created object is deleted. • Copy Constructor: The copy constructor is a constructor which creates an object by initializing it with an object of the same class, which has been created previously. • Friend Functions: A friend function is permitted full access to private and protected members of a class. • Inline Functions: With an inline function, the compiler tries to expand the code in the body of the function in place of a call to the function. • this Pointer: Every object has a special pointer this which points to the object itself. • Pointer to C++ Classes: A pointer to a class is done exactly the same way a pointer to a structure is. In fact a class is really just a structure with functions in it. • Static Members of a Class: Both data members and function members of a class can be declared as static.
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/* using public and private in C++ Class */ // Program to illustrate the working of // public and private in C++ Class #include <iostream> using namespace std; class Room { private: double length; double breadth; double height; public: // function to initialize private variables void initData(double len, double brth, double hgt) { length = len; breadth = brth; height = hgt; } double calculateArea() { return length * breadth; } double calculateVolume() { return length * breadth * height; } }; int main() { // create object of Room class Room room1; // pass the values of private variables as arguments room1.initData(42.5, 30.8, 19.2); cout << "Area of Room = " << room1.calculateArea() << endl; cout << "Volume of Room = " << room1.calculateVolume() << endl; return 0; }
#include Directive in C++
#include is a way of including a standard or user-defined file in the program and is mostly written at the beginning of any C/C++ program. This directive is read by the preprocessor and orders it to insert the content of a user-defined or system header file into the following program. These files are mainly imported from an outside source into the current program. The process of importing such files that might be system-defined or user-defined is known as File Inclusion. This type of preprocessor directive tells the compiler to include a file in the source code program.
Syntax for #include Directive in C++
#include "user-defined_file"
Including using " ": When using the double quotes(" "), the preprocessor access the current directory in which the source "header_file" is located. This type is mainly used to access any header files of the user's program or user-defined files.
#include <header_file>
Including using <>: While importing file using angular brackets(<>), the the preprocessor uses a predetermined directory path to access the file. It is mainly used to access system header files located in the standard system directories. Header File or Standard files: This is a file which contains C/C++ function declarations and macro definitions to be shared between several source files. Functions like the printf(), scanf(), cout, cin and various other input-output or other standard functions are contained within different header files. So to utilise those functions, the users need to import a few header files which define the required functions. User-defined files: These files resembles the header files, except for the fact that they are written and defined by the user itself. This saves the user from writing a particular function multiple times. Once a user-defined file is written, it can be imported anywhere in the program using the #include preprocessor. • In #include directive, comments are not recognized. So in case of #include <a//b>, a//b is treated as filename. • In #include directive, backslash is considered as normal text not escape sequence. So in case of #include <a\nb>, a\nb is treated as filename. • You can use only comment after filename otherwise it will give error.
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/* using #include directive in C language */ #include <stdio.h> int main() { /* * C standard library printf function * defined in the stdio.h header file */ printf("I love you Clementine"); printf("I love you so much"); printf("HappyCodings"); return 0; }
Function Call Operator() Overloading in C++
n C++, we can change the way operators work for user-defined types like objects and structures. This is known as operator overloading. Suppose we have created three objects c1, c2 and result from a class named Complex that represents complex numbers. Since operator overloading allows us to change how operators work, we can redefine how the + operator works and use it to add the complex numbers of c1 and c2 by writing the following code:
result = c1 + c2;
instead of something like
result = c1.addNumbers(c2);
This makes our code intuitive and easy to understand. We cannot use operator overloading for fundamental data types like int, float, char and so on.
Syntax for C++ Operator Overloading
class className { ... .. ... public returnType operator symbol (arguments) { ... .. ... } ... .. ... };
To overload an operator, we use a special operator function. We define the function inside the class or structure whose objects/variables we want the overloaded operator to work with.
returnType
is the return type of the function.
operator
is a keyword.
symbol
is the operator we want to overload. Like: +, <, -, ++, etc.
arguments
is the arguments passed to the function. Unary operators operate on only one operand. The increment operator ++ and decrement operator -- are examples of unary operators.
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/* You can redefine or overload most of the built-in operators available in C++. Thus, a programmer can use operators with user-defined types as well. Overloaded operators are functions with special names: the keyword "operator" followed by the symbol for the operator being defined. Like any other function, an overloaded operator has a return type and a parameter list. */ // Overload ++ when used as prefix #include <iostream> using namespace std; class Count { private: int value; public: // Constructor to initialize count to 5 Count() : value(5) {} // Overload ++ when used as prefix void operator ++ () { ++value; } void display() { cout << "Count: " << value << endl; } }; int main() { Count count1; // Call the "void operator ++ ()" function ++count1; count1.display(); return 0; }
Constructors in C++ Language
In C++, constructor is a special method which is invoked automatically at the time of object creation. It is used to initialize the data members of new object generally. The constructor in C++ has the same name as class or structure. Constructors are special class functions which performs initialization of every object. The Compiler calls the Constructor whenever an object is created. Constructors initialize values to object members after storage is allocated to the object. Whereas, Destructor on the other hand is used to destroy the class object. • Default Constructor: A constructor which has no argument is known as default constructor. It is invoked at the time of creating object.
Syntax for Default Constructor in C++
class_name(parameter1, parameter2, ...) { // constructor Definition }
• Parameterized Constructor: In C++, a constructor with parameters is known as a parameterized constructor. This is the preferred method to initialize member data. These are the constructors with parameter. Using this Constructor you can provide different values to data members of different objects, by passing the appropriate values as argument.
Syntax for Parameterized Constructor in C++
class class_name { public: class_name(variables) //Parameterized constructor declared. { } };
• Copy Constructors: These are special type of Constructors which takes an object as argument, and is used to copy values of data members of one object into other object.
Syntax for Copy Constructors in C++
classname (const classname &obj) { // body of constructor }
The copy constructor is a constructor which creates an object by initializing it with an object of the same class, which has been created previously. The copy constructor is used to - • Initialize one object from another of the same type. • Copy an object to pass it as an argument to a function. • Copy an object to return it from a function. If a copy constructor is not defined in a class, the compiler itself defines one.If the class has pointer variables and has some dynamic memory allocations, then it is a must to have a copy constructor. The most common form of copy constructor is shown here.
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/* A constructor is a special type of member function that is called automatically when an object is created. In C++, a constructor has the same name as that of the class and it does not have a return type. */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; // declare a class class Wall { private: double length; double height; public: // initialize variables with parameterized constructor Wall(double len, double hgt) { length = len; height = hgt; } // copy constructor with a Wall object as parameter // copies data of the obj parameter Wall(Wall &obj) { length = obj.length; height = obj.height; } double calculateArea() { return length * height; } }; int main() { // create an object of Wall class Wall wall1(10.5, 8.6); // copy contents of wall1 to wall2 Wall wall2 = wall1; // print areas of wall1 and wall2 cout << "Area of Wall 1: " << wall1.calculateArea() << endl; cout << "Area of Wall 2: " << wall2.calculateArea(); return 0; }
What is an Array in C++ Language
An array is defined as the collection of similar type of data items stored at contiguous memory locations. Arrays are the derived data type in C++ programming language which can store the primitive type of data such as int, char, double, float, etc. It also has the capability to store the collection of derived data types, such as pointers, structure, etc. The array is the simplest data structure where each data element can be randomly accessed by using its index number. C++ array is beneficial if you have to store similar elements. For example, if we want to store the marks of a student in 6 subjects, then we don't need to define different variables for the marks in the different subject. Instead of that, we can define an array which can store the marks in each subject at the contiguous memory locations. By using the array, we can access the elements easily. Only a few lines of code are required to access the elements of the array.
Properties of Array
The array contains the following properties. • Each element of an array is of same data type and carries the same size, i.e., int = 4 bytes. • Elements of the array are stored at contiguous memory locations where the first element is stored at the smallest memory location. • Elements of the array can be randomly accessed since we can calculate the address of each element of the array with the given base address and the size of the data element.
Advantage of C++ Array
• 1) Code Optimization: Less code to the access the data. • 2) Ease of traversing: By using the for loop, we can retrieve the elements of an array easily. • 3) Ease of sorting: To sort the elements of the array, we need a few lines of code only. • 4) Random Access: We can access any element randomly using the array.
Disadvantage of C++ Array
• 1) Allows a fixed number of elements to be entered which is decided at the time of declaration. Unlike a linked list, an array in C++ is not dynamic. • 2) Insertion and deletion of elements can be costly since the elements are needed to be managed in accordance with the new memory allocation.
Declaration of C++ Array
To declare an array in C++, a programmer specifies the type of the elements and the number of elements required by an array as follows
type arrayName [ arraySize ];
This is called a single-dimensional array. The arraySize must be an integer constant greater than zero and type can be any valid C++ data type. For example, to declare a 10-element array called balance of type double, use this statement
double balance[10];
Here balance is a variable array which is sufficient to hold up to 10 double numbers.
Initializing Arrays
You can initialize an array in C++ either one by one or using a single statement as follows
double balance[5] = {850, 3.0, 7.4, 7.0, 88};
The number of values between braces { } cannot be larger than the number of elements that we declare for the array between square brackets [ ]. If you omit the size of the array, an array just big enough to hold the initialization is created. Therefore, if you write
double balance[] = {850, 3.0, 7.4, 7.0, 88};
Accessing Array Elements
An element is accessed by indexing the array name. This is done by placing the index of the element within square brackets after the name of the array.
double salary = balance[9];
The above statement will take the 10th element from the array and assign the value to salary variable.
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/* arrays in C++ Language */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { // initialize an array without specifying size double numbers[] = {7, 5, 6, 12, 35, 27}; double sum = 0; double count = 0; double average; cout << "The numbers are: "; // print array elements // use of range-based for loop for (const double &n : numbers) { cout << n << " "; // calculate the sum sum += n; // count the no. of array elements ++count; } // print the sum cout << "\nTheir Sum = " << sum << endl; // find the average average = sum / count; cout << "Their Average = " << average << endl; return 0; }
For Loop Statement in C++
In computer programming, loops are used to repeat a block of code. For example, when you are displaying number from 1 to 100 you may want set the value of a variable to 1 and display it 100 times, increasing its value by 1 on each loop iteration. When you know exactly how many times you want to loop through a block of code, use the for loop instead of a while loop. A for loop is a repetition control structure that allows you to efficiently write a loop that needs to execute a specific number of times.
Syntax of For Loop Statement in C++
for (initialization; condition; update) { // body of-loop }
initialization
initializes variables and is executed only once.
condition
if true, the body of for loop is executed, if false, the for loop is terminated.
update
updates the value of initialized variables and again checks the condition. A new range-based for loop was introduced to work with collections such as arrays and vectors.
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/* For Loop Statement in C++ Language */ // C++ program to find the sum of first n natural numbers // positive integers such as 1,2,3,...n are known as natural numbers #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int num, sum; sum = 0; cout << "Enter a positive integer: "; cin >> num; for (int i = 1; i <= num; ++i) { sum += i; } cout << "Sum = " << sum << endl; return 0; }
Functions in C++
The function in C++ language is also known as procedure or subroutine in other programming languages. To perform any task, we can create function. A function can be called many times. It provides modularity and code reusability. Functions are used to provide modularity to a program. Creating an application using function makes it easier to understand, edit, check...
Defining a Function in C++
return-type function-name(parameter1, parameter2, ...) { // function-body }
return type
suggests what the function will return. It can be int, char, some pointer or even a class object. There can be functions which does not return anything, they are mentioned with void.
name
Function name is the name of the function, using the function name it is called.
parameters
Parameters are variables to hold values of arguments passed while function is called. A function may or may not contain parameter list.
body
Function body is the part where the code statements are written. Function declaration, is done to tell the compiler about the existence of the function. Function's return type, its name & parameter list is mentioned. Function body is written in its definition. Functions are called by their names. If the function is without argument, it can be called directly using its name. But for functions with arguments, we have two ways to call them: • Call by Value: In this calling technique we pass the values of arguments which are stored or copied into the formal parameters of functions. Hence, the original values are unchanged only the parameters inside function changes. • Call by Reference: In this we pass the address of the variable as arguments. In this case the formal parameter can be taken as a reference or a pointer, in both the case they will change the values of the original variable.
Advantage of Functions
• Code Reusability: By creating functions in C++, you can call it many times. So we don't need to write the same code again and again. • Code optimization: It makes the code optimized, we don't need to write much code.
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/* function with parameters in C++ language */ // program to print a text #include <iostream> using namespace std; // display a number void displayNum(int n1, float n2) { cout << "The int number is " << n1; cout << "The double number is " << n2; } int main() { int num1 = 5; double num2 = 5.5; // calling the function displayNum(num1, num2); return 0; }


This "C++" Program implement transposition technique. In "Cryptography", a transposition cipher is a method of encryption by which the positions held by units of plaintext (which are
Algorithm print all the 'possible combination' of each length from the given array. The time complexity of this algorithm is 'O(n*(2^n))'. A function to print all 'Combination of a Length'
Program has 'three functions' which receives 2 pointers reference. Three functions returns int, float and double sum of numbers. So this c++ tutorial use the following concepts. Write