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C++ Programming Code Examples

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Cout width example

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/* Cout width example illustrates setting cout width */ #include <iostream.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <iomanip.h> int main() { cout<<setw(20)<<"setw(20)"<<endl; cout<<setw(10)<<"setw(10)"<<endl; cout<<setw(15)<<"setw(15)"<<endl; return 0; }
#include Directive in C++
#include is a way of including a standard or user-defined file in the program and is mostly written at the beginning of any C/C++ program. This directive is read by the preprocessor and orders it to insert the content of a user-defined or system header file into the following program. These files are mainly imported from an outside source into the current program. The process of importing such files that might be system-defined or user-defined is known as File Inclusion. This type of preprocessor directive tells the compiler to include a file in the source code program.
Syntax for #include Directive in C++
#include "user-defined_file"
Including using " ": When using the double quotes(" "), the preprocessor access the current directory in which the source "header_file" is located. This type is mainly used to access any header files of the user's program or user-defined files.
#include <header_file>
Including using <>: While importing file using angular brackets(<>), the the preprocessor uses a predetermined directory path to access the file. It is mainly used to access system header files located in the standard system directories. Header File or Standard files: This is a file which contains C/C++ function declarations and macro definitions to be shared between several source files. Functions like the printf(), scanf(), cout, cin and various other input-output or other standard functions are contained within different header files. So to utilise those functions, the users need to import a few header files which define the required functions. User-defined files: These files resembles the header files, except for the fact that they are written and defined by the user itself. This saves the user from writing a particular function multiple times. Once a user-defined file is written, it can be imported anywhere in the program using the #include preprocessor. • In #include directive, comments are not recognized. So in case of #include <a//b>, a//b is treated as filename. • In #include directive, backslash is considered as normal text not escape sequence. So in case of #include <a\nb>, a\nb is treated as filename. • You can use only comment after filename otherwise it will give error.
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/* using #include directive in C language */ #include <stdio.h> int main() { /* * C standard library printf function * defined in the stdio.h header file */ printf("I love you Clementine"); printf("I love you so much"); printf("HappyCodings"); return 0; }
main() Function in C++
A program shall contain a global function named main, which is the designated start of the program in hosted environment. main() function is the entry point of any C++ program. It is the point at which execution of program is started. When a C++ program is executed, the execution control goes directly to the main() function. Every C++ program have a main() function.
Syntax for main() Function in C++
void main() { ............ ............ }
void
void is a keyword in C++ language, void means nothing, whenever we use void as a function return type then that function nothing return. here main() function no return any value.
main
main is a name of function which is predefined function in C++ library. In place of void we can also use int return type of main() function, at that time main() return integer type value. 1) It cannot be used anywhere in the program a) in particular, it cannot be called recursively b) its address cannot be taken 2) It cannot be predefined and cannot be overloaded: effectively, the name main in the global namespace is reserved for functions (although it can be used to name classes, namespaces, enumerations, and any entity in a non-global namespace, except that a function called "main" cannot be declared with C language linkage in any namespace). 3) It cannot be defined as deleted or (since C++11) declared with C language linkage, constexpr (since C++11), consteval (since C++20), inline, or static. 4) The body of the main function does not need to contain the return statement: if control reaches the end of main without encountering a return statement, the effect is that of executing return 0;. 5) Execution of the return (or the implicit return upon reaching the end of main) is equivalent to first leaving the function normally (which destroys the objects with automatic storage duration) and then calling std::exit with the same argument as the argument of the return. (std::exit then destroys static objects and terminates the program). 6) (since C++14) The return type of the main function cannot be deduced (auto main() {... is not allowed). 7) (since C++20) The main function cannot be a coroutine.
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/* simple code example by main() function in C++ */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int day = 4; switch (day) { case 1: cout << "Monday"; break; case 2: cout << "Tuesday"; break; case 3: cout << "Wednesday"; break; case 4: cout << "Thursday"; break; case 5: cout << "Friday"; break; case 6: cout << "Saturday"; break; case 7: cout << "Sunday"; break; } return 0; }
Iomanip Library setw() Function in C++
Set field width. Sets the field width to be used on output operations. The C++ function std::setw behaves as if member width were called with n as argument on the stream on which it is inserted/extracted as a manipulator (it can be inserted/extracted on input streams or output streams). It is used to sets the field width to be used on output operations. This manipulator is declared in header <iomanip>.
Syntax for setw() Function in C++
#include <iomanip> /*undefined*/ setw (int n);
n
Number of characters to be used as field width. This method accepts n as a parameter which is the integer argument corresponding to which the field width is to be set. This function returns an object of unspecified type. The setw function should only be used as a stream manipulator. Like the different functions in C++ the setw() function helps in setting the field width which will be used on output operations. This function will take the member width whenever it will be called as an argument. It will need a stream where this field will be inserted or manipulated. This function will set the width parameter of the stream out or stream in to exactly n times. It will take the parameter which will be the new value of the width to which this has to be set.
Data races
The stream object on which it is inserted/extracted is modified. Concurrent access to the same stream object may introduce data races.
Exception safety
Basic guarantee: if an exception is thrown, the stream is in a valid state.
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/* specify the minimum number of character positions on the output field a variable will consume by setw function() code example. */ // C++ code to demonstrate the working of setw() function #include <iomanip> #include <ios> #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { // Initializing the integer int num = 50; cout << "Before setting the width: \n" << num << endl; // Using setw() cout << "Setting the width" << " using setw to 5: \n" << setw(5); cout << num << endl; return 0; }
Return Statement in C++
A return statement ends the processing of the current function and returns control to the caller of the function. A value-returning function should include a return statement, containing an expression. If an expression is not given on a return statement in a function declared with a non-void return type, the compiler issues an error message. If the data type of the expression is different from the function return type, conversion of the return value takes place as if the value of the expression were assigned to an object with the same function return type.
Syntax for Return Statement in C++
return[expression];
For a function of return type void, a return statement is not strictly necessary. If the end of such a function is reached without encountering a return statement, control is passed to the caller as if a return statement without an expression were encountered. In other words, an implicit return takes place upon completion of the final statement, and control automatically returns to the calling function. If a return statement is used, it must not contain an expression. The following are examples of return statements:
return; /* Returns no value */ return result; /* Returns the value of result */ return 1; /* Returns the value 1 */ return (x * x); /* Returns the value of x * x */
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/* illustrate Methods returning a value using return statement in C++ code example */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; // non-void return type // function to calculate sum int SUM(int a, int b) { int s1 = a + b; // method using the return // statement to return a value return s1; } // Driver method int main() { int num1 = 10; int num2 = 10; int sum_of = SUM(num1, num2); cout << "The sum is " << sum_of; return 0; }
Standard end line (endl) in C++
A predefined object of the class called iostream class is used to insert the new line characters while flushing the stream is called endl in C++. This endl is similar to \n which performs the functionality of inserting new line characters but it does not flush the stream whereas endl does the job of inserting the new line characters while flushing the stream. Hence the statement cout<<endl; will be equal to the statement cout<< '\n' << flush; meaning the new line character used along with flush explicitly becomes equivalent to the endl statement in C++.
Syntax for end line (endl) in C++
cout<< statement to be executed <<endl;
Whenever the program is writing the output data to the stream, all the data will not be written to the terminal at once. Instead, it will be written to the buffer until enough data is collected in the buffer to output to the terminal. But if are using flush in our program, the entire output data will be flushed to the terminal directly without storing anything in the buffer. Whenever there is a need to insert the new line character to display the output in the next line while flushing the stream, we can make use of endl in C++. Whenever there is a need to insert the new line character to display the output in the next line, we can make use of endl in '\n' character but it does not do the job of flushing the stream. So if we want to insert a new line character along with flushing the stream, we make use of endl in C++. Whenever the program is writing the output data to the stream, all the data will not be written to the terminal at once. Instead, it will be written to the buffer until enough data is collected in the buffer to output to the terminal. • It is a manipulator. • It doesn't occupy any memory. • It is a keyword and would not specify any meaning when stored in a string. • We cannot write 'endl' in between double quotations. • It is only supported by C++. • It keeps flushing the queue in the output buffer throughout the process.
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/* Standard end line (endl) in C++ language */ //The header file iostream is imported to enable us to use cout in the program #include <iostream> //a namespace called std is defined using namespace std; //main method is called int main( ) { //cout is used to output the statement cout<< "Welcome to "; //cout is used to output the statement along with endl to start the next statement in the new line and flush the output stream cout<< "C#"<<endl; //cout is used to output the statement along with endl to start the next statement in the new line and flush the output stream cout<< "Learning is fun"<<endl; }
Standard Output Stream (cout) in C++
The cout is a predefined object of ostream class. It is connected with the standard output device, which is usually a display screen. The cout is used in conjunction with stream insertion operator (<<) to display the output on a console. On most program environments, the standard output by default is the screen, and the C++ stream object defined to access it is cout.
Syntax for cout in C++
cout << var_name; //or cout << "Some String";
The syntax of the cout object in C++: cout << var_name; Or cout << "Some String";
<<
is the insertion operator
var_name
is usually a variable, but can also be an array element or elements of containers like vectors, lists, maps, etc. The "c" in cout refers to "character" and "out" means "output". Hence cout means "character output". The cout object is used along with the insertion operator << in order to display a stream of characters. The << operator can be used more than once with a combination of variables, strings, and manipulators. cout is used for displaying data on the screen. The operator << called as insertion operator or put to operator. The Insertion operator can be overloaded. Insertion operator is similar to the printf() operation in C. cout is the object of ostream class. Data flow direction is from variable to output device. Multiple outputs can be displayed using cout.
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/* standard output stream (cout) in C++ language */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { string str = "Do not interrupt me"; char ch = 'm'; // use cout with write() cout.write(str,6); cout << endl; // use cout with put() cout.put(ch); return 0; }