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C++ Programming Code Examples

C++ > Computer Graphics Code Examples

Program to Check the Connectivity of Directed Graph Using BFS

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/* Program to Check the Connectivity of Directed Graph Using BFS This is a C++ Program to check the connectivity of directed graph using BFS. */ #include <iostream> #include <list> #include <queue> using namespace std; /* Class Declaration */ class Graph { private: int V; list<int> *adj; public: Graph(int V) { this->V = V; adj = new list<int> [V]; } void addEdge(int v, int w); void BFS(int s, bool visited[]); Graph getTranspose(); bool isConnected(); }; /* Add Edge to connect v and w */ void Graph::addEdge(int v, int w) { adj[v].push_back(w); //adj[w].push_back(v); } /* A recursive function to print BFS starting from s */ void Graph::BFS(int s, bool visited[]) { list<int> q; list<int>::iterator i; visited[s] = true; q.push_back(s); while (!q.empty()) { s = q.front(); q.pop_front(); for (i = adj[s].begin(); i != adj[s].end(); ++i) { if (!visited[*i]) { visited[*i] = true; q.push_back(*i); } } } } /* Function that returns reverse (or transpose) of this graph */ Graph Graph::getTranspose() { Graph g(V); for (int v = 0; v < V; v++) { list<int>::iterator i; for (i = adj[v].begin(); i != adj[v].end(); ++i) { g.adj[*i].push_back(v); } } return g; } /* Check if Graph is Connected */ bool Graph::isConnected() { bool visited[V]; for (int i = 0; i < V; i++) visited[i] = false; BFS(0, visited); for (int i = 0; i < V; i++) if (visited[i] == false) return false; Graph gr = getTranspose(); for (int i = 0; i < V; i++) visited[i] = false; gr.BFS(0, visited); for (int i = 0; i < V; i++) if (visited[i] == false) return false; return true; } /* Main Contains Menu */ int main() { Graph g(4); g.addEdge(0, 1); g.addEdge(0, 2); g.addEdge(1, 2); g.addEdge(2, 3); g.addEdge(3, 3); if (g.isConnected()) cout << "The Graph 1 is Connected" << endl; else cout << "The Graph 1 is not Connected" << endl; Graph g1(5); g1.addEdge(0, 1); g1.addEdge(1, 2); g1.addEdge(2, 3); g1.addEdge(3, 0); g1.addEdge(2, 4); g1.addEdge(4, 2); if (g1.isConnected()) cout << "The Graph 2 is Connected" << endl; else cout << "The Graph 2 is not Connected" << endl; return 0; }
#include Directive in C++
#include is a way of including a standard or user-defined file in the program and is mostly written at the beginning of any C/C++ program. This directive is read by the preprocessor and orders it to insert the content of a user-defined or system header file into the following program. These files are mainly imported from an outside source into the current program. The process of importing such files that might be system-defined or user-defined is known as File Inclusion. This type of preprocessor directive tells the compiler to include a file in the source code program.
Syntax for #include Directive in C++
#include "user-defined_file"
Including using " ": When using the double quotes(" "), the preprocessor access the current directory in which the source "header_file" is located. This type is mainly used to access any header files of the user's program or user-defined files.
#include <header_file>
Including using <>: While importing file using angular brackets(<>), the the preprocessor uses a predetermined directory path to access the file. It is mainly used to access system header files located in the standard system directories. Header File or Standard files: This is a file which contains C/C++ function declarations and macro definitions to be shared between several source files. Functions like the printf(), scanf(), cout, cin and various other input-output or other standard functions are contained within different header files. So to utilise those functions, the users need to import a few header files which define the required functions. User-defined files: These files resembles the header files, except for the fact that they are written and defined by the user itself. This saves the user from writing a particular function multiple times. Once a user-defined file is written, it can be imported anywhere in the program using the #include preprocessor. • In #include directive, comments are not recognized. So in case of #include <a//b>, a//b is treated as filename. • In #include directive, backslash is considered as normal text not escape sequence. So in case of #include <a\nb>, a\nb is treated as filename. • You can use only comment after filename otherwise it will give error.
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/* using #include directive in C language */ #include <stdio.h> int main() { /* * C standard library printf function * defined in the stdio.h header file */ printf("I love you Clementine"); printf("I love you so much"); printf("HappyCodings"); return 0; }
Memory Management new Operator in C++
Allocate storage space. Default allocation functions (single-object form). A new operator is used to create the object while a delete operator is used to delete the object. When the object is created by using the new operator, then the object will exist until we explicitly use the delete operator to delete the object. Therefore, we can say that the lifetime of the object is not related to the block structure of the program.
Syntax for new Operator in C++
#include <new> //throwing (1) void* operator new (std::size_t size); //nothrow (2) void* operator new (std::size_t size, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_value) noexcept; //placement (3) void* operator new (std::size_t size, void* ptr) noexcept;
size
Size in bytes of the requested memory block. This is the size of the type specifier in the new-expression when called automatically by such an expression. If this argument is zero, the function still returns a distinct non-null pointer on success (although dereferencing this pointer leads to undefined behavior). size_t is an integral type.
nothrow_value
The constant nothrow. This parameter is only used to distinguish it from the first version with an overloaded version. When the nothrow constant is passed as second parameter to operator new, operator new returns a null-pointer on failure instead of throwing a bad_alloc exception. nothrow_t is the type of constant nothrow.
ptr
A pointer to an already-allocated memory block of the proper size. If called by a new-expression, the object is initialized (or constructed) at this location. For the first and second versions, function returns a pointer to the newly allocated storage space. For the third version, ptr is returned. • (1) throwing allocation: Allocates size bytes of storage, suitably aligned to represent any object of that size, and returns a non-null pointer to the first byte of this block. On failure, it throws a bad_alloc exception. • (2) nothrow allocation: Same as above (1), except that on failure it returns a null pointer instead of throwing an exception. The default definition allocates memory by calling the the first version: ::operator new (size). If replaced, both the first and second versions shall return pointers with identical properties. • (3) placement: Simply returns ptr (no storage is allocated). Notice though that, if the function is called by a new-expression, the proper initialization will be performed (for class objects, this includes calling its default constructor). The default allocation and deallocation functions are special components of the standard library; They have the following unique properties: • Global: All three versions of operator new are declared in the global namespace, not within the std namespace. • Implicit: The allocating versions ((1) and (2)) are implicitly declared in every translation unit of a C++ program, no matter whether header <new> is included or not. • Replaceable: The allocating versions ((1) and (2)) are also replaceable: A program may provide its own definition that replaces the one provided by default to produce the result described above, or can overload it for specific types. If set_new_handler has been used to define a new_handler function, this new-handler function is called by the default definitions of the allocating versions ((1) and (2)) if they fail to allocate the requested storage. operator new can be called explicitly as a regular function, but in C++, new is an operator with a very specific behavior: An expression with the new operator, first calls function operator new (i.e., this function) with the size of its type specifier as first argument, and if this is successful, it then automatically initializes or constructs the object (if needed). Finally, the expression evaluates as a pointer to the appropriate type.
Data races
Modifies the storage referenced by the returned value. Calls to allocation and deallocation functions that reuse the same unit of storage shall occur in a single total order where each deallocation happens entirely before the next allocation. This shall also apply to the observable behavior of custom replacements for this function.
Exception safety
The first version (1) throws bad_alloc if it fails to allocate storage. Otherwise, it throws no exceptions (no-throw guarantee).
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/* C++ allows us to allocate the memory of a variable or an array in run time. This is known as dynamic memory allocation. The new operator denotes a request for memory allocation on the Free Store. If sufficient memory is available, new operator initializes the memory and returns the address of the newly allocated and initialized memory to the pointer variable. */ /* Allocate storage space by operator new */ // C++ program code example to illustrate dynamic allocation and deallocation of memory using new and delete #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main () { // Pointer initialization to null int* p = NULL; // Request memory for the variable // using new operator p = new(nothrow) int; if (!p) cout << "allocation of memory failed\n"; else { // Store value at allocated address *p = 29; cout << "Value of p: " << *p << endl; } // Request block of memory // using new operator float *r = new float(75.25); cout << "Value of r: " << *r << endl; // Request block of memory of size n int n = 5; int *q = new(nothrow) int[n]; if (!q) cout << "allocation of memory failed\n"; else { for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) q[i] = i+1; cout << "Value store in block of memory: "; for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) cout << q[i] << " "; } // freed the allocated memory delete p; delete r; // freed the block of allocated memory delete[] q; return 0; }
List Library front() Function in C++
Access first element. Returns a reference to the first element in the list container. The C++ list::front function returns a reference to the first element of the list. Please note that, Unlike the list::begin function, which returns the iterator pointing to the first element, it returns the a direct reference to the same element of the list. Unlike member list::begin, which returns an iterator to this same element, this function returns a direct reference. Calling this function on an empty container causes undefined behavior.
Syntax for List front() Function in C++
#include <list> reference front(); const_reference front() const;
No parameter is required. Function returns a reference to the first element in the list container. If the list object is const-qualified, the function returns a const_reference. Otherwise, it returns a reference. Member types reference and const_reference are the reference types to the elements of the container (see list member types).
Complexity
Constant
Iterator validity
No changes
Data races
The container is accessed (neither the const nor the non-const versions modify the container). The first element is potentially accessed or modified by the caller. Concurrently accessing or modifying other elements is safe.
Exception safety
If the container is not empty, the function never throws exceptions (no-throw guarantee). Otherwise, it causes undefined behavior.
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/* The list::front() is a built-in function in C++ STL which is used to return a reference to the first element in a list container. Unlike the list::begin() function, this function returns a direct reference to the first element in the list container. */ /* return the first element of the list by front() function code example. */ #include <iostream> #include <list> using namespace std; int main (){ list<int> MyList{10, 20, 30, 40, 50}; cout<<"The first element of MyList is: "; cout<<MyList.front(); cout<<"\n\nAdd 100 to the first element of the MyList.\n"; MyList.front() = MyList.front() + 100; cout<<"Now, The first element of MyList is: "; cout<<MyList.front(); return 0; }
List Library begin() Function in C++
Return iterator to beginning. Returns an iterator pointing to the first element in the list container. Notice that, unlike member list::front, which returns a reference to the first element, this function returns a bidirectional iterator pointing to it. If the container is empty, the returned iterator value shall not be dereferenced. begin() function is used to return an iterator pointing to the first element of the list container. It is different from the front() function because the front function returns a reference to the first element of the container but begin() function returns a bidirectional iterator to the first element of the container.
Syntax for List begin() Function in C++
#include <list> iterator begin() noexcept; const_iterator begin() const noexcept;
This function does not accept any parameter. Function returns an iterator to the beginning of the sequence container. If the list object is const-qualified, the function returns a const_iterator. Otherwise, it returns an iterator. Member types iterator and const_iterator are bidirectional iterator types (pointing to an element and to a const element, respectively). If list object is constant qualified then method returns constant random access iterator otherwise non constant random access iterator.
Complexity
Constant
Iterator validity
No changes
Data races
The container is accessed (neither the const nor the non-const versions modify the container). No contained elements are accessed by the call, but the iterator returned can be used to access or modify elements. Concurrently accessing or modifying different elements is safe.
Exception safety
No-throw guarantee: this member function never throws exceptions. The copy construction or assignment of the returned iterator is also guaranteed to never throw.
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/* returns a random access iterator which points to the first element of the list by std::list::begin() function code example */ // CPP program to illustrate implementation of end() function #include <iostream> #include <list> using namespace std; int main() { // declaration of list container list<int> mylist{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }; // using end() to print list for (auto it = mylist.begin(); it != mylist.end(); ++it) cout << ' ' << *it; return 0; }
Iterators in C++ Language
Iterators are just like pointers used to access the container elements. Iterators are one of the four pillars of the Standard Template Library or STL in C++. An iterator is used to point to the memory address of the STL container classes. For better understanding, you can relate them with a pointer, to some extent. Iterators act as a bridge that connects algorithms to STL containers and allows the modifications of the data present inside the container. They allow you to iterate over the container, access and assign the values, and run different operators over them, to get the desired result.
Syntax for Iterators in C++
<ContainerType> :: iterator; <ContainerType> :: const_iterator;
• Iterators are used to traverse from one element to another element, a process is known as iterating through the container. • The main advantage of an iterator is to provide a common interface for all the containers type. • Iterators make the algorithm independent of the type of the container used. • Iterators provide a generic approach to navigate through the elements of a container. Operator (*) : The '*' operator returns the element of the current position pointed by the iterator. Operator (++) : The '++' operator increments the iterator by one. Therefore, an iterator points to the next element of the container. Operator (==) and Operator (!=) : Both these operators determine whether the two iterators point to the same position or not. Operator (=) : The '=' operator assigns the iterator. Iterators can be smart pointers which allow to iterate over the complex data structures. A Container provides its iterator type. Therefore, we can say that the iterators have the common interface with different container type. The container classes provide two basic member functions that allow to iterate or move through the elements of a container: begin(): The begin() function returns an iterator pointing to the first element of the container. end(): The end() function returns an iterator pointing to the past-the-last element of the container. Input Iterator: An input iterator is an iterator used to access the elements from the container, but it does not modify the value of a container. Operators used for an input iterator are: Increment operator(++), Equal operator(==), Not equal operator(!=), Dereference operator(*). Output Iterator: An output iterator is an iterator used to modify the value of a container, but it does not read the value from a container. Therefore, we can say that an output iterator is a write-only iterator. Operators used for an output iterator are: Increment operator(++), Assignment operator(=). Forward Iterator: A forward iterator is an iterator used to read and write to a container. It is a multi-pass iterator. Operators used for a Forward iterator are: Increment operator(++), Assignment operator(=), Equal operator(=), Not equal operator(!=). Bidirectional iterator: A bidirectional iterator is an iterator supports all the features of a forward iterator plus it adds one more feature, i.e., decrement operator(--). We can move backward by decrementing an iterator. Operators used for a Bidirectional iterator are: Increment operator(++), Assignment operator(=), Equal operator(=), Not equal operator(!=), Decrement operator(--). Random Access Iterator: A Random Access iterator is an iterator provides random access of an element at an arbitrary location. It has all the features of a bidirectional iterator plus it adds one more feature, i.e., pointer addition and pointer subtraction to provide random access to an element. Following are the disadvantages of an iterator: • If we want to move from one data structure to another at the same time, iterators won't work. • If we want to update the structure which is being iterated, an iterator won?t allow us to do because of the way it stores the position. • If we want to backtrack while processing through a list, the iterator will not work in this case. Following are the advantages of an iterator: • Ease in programming: It is convenient to use iterators rather than using a subscript operator[] to access the elements of a container. If we use subscript operator[] to access the elements, then we need to keep the track of the number of elements added at the runtime, but this would not happen in the case of an iterator. • Code Reusability: A code can be reused if we use iterators. In the above example, if we replace vector with the list, and then the subscript operator[] would not work to access the elements as the list does not support the random access. However, we use iterators to access the elements, then we can also access the list elements. • Dynamic Processing: C++ iterators provide the facility to add or delete the data dynamically.
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/* Iterators in C++ language */ // C++ code to demonstrate the working of next() and prev() #include<iostream> #include<iterator> // for iterators #include<vector> // for vectors using namespace std; int main() { vector<int> ar = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }; // Declaring iterators to a vector vector<int>::iterator ptr = ar.begin(); vector<int>::iterator ftr = ar.end(); // Using next() to return new iterator // points to 4 auto it = next(ptr, 3); // Using prev() to return new iterator // points to 3 auto it1 = prev(ftr, 3); // Displaying iterator position cout << "The position of new iterator using next() is : "; cout << *it << " "; cout << endl; // Displaying iterator position cout << "The position of new iterator using prev() is : "; cout << *it1 << " "; cout << endl; return 0; }
List Library empty() Function in C++
Test whether container is empty. Returns whether the list container is empty (i.e. whether its size is 0). The C++ list::empty function is used to check whether the list is empty or not. It returns true if the size of the list is zero, else returns false. This function does not modify the container in any way. To clear the content of a list container, see list::clear.
Syntax for List empty() Function in C++
#include <list> bool empty() const noexcept;
No parameter is passed to the function. Function returns true if the container size is 0, false otherwise.
Complexity
Constant
Iterator validity
No changes
Data races
The container is accessed. No contained elements are accessed: concurrently accessing or modifying them is safe.
Exception safety
No-throw guarantee: this member function never throws exceptions.
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/* list::empty() is an inbuilt function in C++ STL which is declared in header file. list::empty() checks whether the given list container is empty(size is 0) or not, and returns true value if the list is empty and false if the list is not empty. */ /* check whether the list is empty or not by C++ List empty() function code example. */ #include <iostream> #include <list> using namespace std; int main() { //declare and initialize lists list<int> list1 {10, 20, 30, 40, 50}; list<int> list2; //check list1 is empty or not if(list1.empty()) cout<<"list1 is an empty list\n"; else cout<<"list1 is not an empty list\n"; //check list2 is empty or not if(list2.empty()) cout<<"list2 is an empty list\n"; else cout<<"list2 is not an empty list\n"; return 0; }
List Library end() Function in C++
Return iterator to end. Returns an iterator referring to the past-the-end element in the list container. The past-the-end element is the theoretical element that would follow the last element in the list container. It does not point to any element, and thus shall not be dereferenced. Because the ranges used by functions of the standard library do not include the element pointed by their closing iterator, this function is often used in combination with list::begin to specify a range including all the elements in the container. If the container is empty, this function returns the same as list::begin.
Syntax for List end() Function in C++
#include <list> iterator end() noexcept; const_iterator end() const noexcept;
This function does not accept any parameter. Function returns an iterator to the element past the end of the sequence. If the list object is const-qualified, the function returns a const_iterator. Otherwise, it returns an iterator. Member types iterator and const_iterator are bidirectional iterator types (pointing to an element and to a const element, respectively). The list::end() is a built-in function in C++ STL which is used to get an iterator to past the last element. By past the last element it is meant that the iterator returned by the end() function return an iterator to an element which follows the last element in the list container. It can not be used to modify the element or the list container.
Complexity
Constant
Iterator validity
No changes
Data races
The container is accessed (neither the const nor the non-const versions modify the container). No contained elements are accessed by the call, but the iterator returned can be used to access or modify elements. Concurrently accessing or modifying different elements is safe.
Exception safety
No-throw guarantee: this member function never throws exceptions. The copy construction or assignment of the returned iterator is also guaranteed to never throw.
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/* returns a random access iterator which points to the last element of the list by std::list::end() function code example */ // CPP program to illustrate the list::end() function #include <bits/stdc++.h> using namespace std; int main() { // Creating a list list<int> demoList; // Add elements to the List demoList.push_back(10); demoList.push_back(20); demoList.push_back(30); demoList.push_back(40); // using end() to get iterator // to past the last element list<int>::iterator it = demoList.end(); // This will not print the last element cout << "Returned iterator points to : " << *it << endl; // Using end() with begin() as a range to // print all of the list elements for (auto itr = demoList.begin(); itr != demoList.end(); itr++) { cout << *itr << " "; } return 0; }
For Loop Statement in C++
In computer programming, loops are used to repeat a block of code. For example, when you are displaying number from 1 to 100 you may want set the value of a variable to 1 and display it 100 times, increasing its value by 1 on each loop iteration. When you know exactly how many times you want to loop through a block of code, use the for loop instead of a while loop. A for loop is a repetition control structure that allows you to efficiently write a loop that needs to execute a specific number of times.
Syntax of For Loop Statement in C++
for (initialization; condition; update) { // body of-loop }
initialization
initializes variables and is executed only once.
condition
if true, the body of for loop is executed, if false, the for loop is terminated.
update
updates the value of initialized variables and again checks the condition. A new range-based for loop was introduced to work with collections such as arrays and vectors.
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/* For Loop Statement in C++ Language */ // C++ program to find the sum of first n natural numbers // positive integers such as 1,2,3,...n are known as natural numbers #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int num, sum; sum = 0; cout << "Enter a positive integer: "; cin >> num; for (int i = 1; i <= num; ++i) { sum += i; } cout << "Sum = " << sum << endl; return 0; }
List in C++ Language
List is a popularly used sequence container. Container is an object that holds data of same type. List container is implemented as doubly linked-list, hence it provides bidirectional sequential access to it's data. List doesn't provide fast random access, it only supports sequential access in both directions. List allows insertion and deletion operation anywhere within a sequence in constant time. Elements of list can be scattered in different chunks of memory. Container stores necessary information to allow sequential access to it's data. Lists can shrink or expand as needed from both ends at run time. The storage requirement is fulfilled automatically by internal allocator. Zero sized lists are also valid. In that case list.begin() and list.end() points to same location. But behavior of calling front() or back() is undefined. To define the std::list, we have to import the <list> header file.
Definition Syntax for Lists in C++
template < class Type, class Alloc =allocator<T> > class list;
T
Defines the type of element contained. You can substitute T by any data type, even user-defined types.
Alloc
Defines the type of the allocator object. This uses the allocator class template by default. It's value-dependent and uses a simple memory allocation model. • List is a contiguous container while vector is a non-contiguous container i.e list stores the elements on a contiguous memory and vector stores on a non-contiguous memory. • Insertion and deletion in the middle of the vector is very costly as it takes lot of time in shifting all the elements. Linklist overcome this problem and it is implemented using list container. • List supports a bidirectional and provides an efficient way for insertion and deletion operations. • Traversal is slow in list as list elements are accessed sequentially while vector supports a random access. Following member types can be used as parameters or return type by member functions: • value_type T (First parameter of the template) • allocator_type Alloc (Second parameter of the template) • reference value_type& • const_reference const value_type& • pointer value_type* • const_pointer const value_type* • iterator a random access iterator to value_type • const_iterator a random access iterator to const value_type • reverse_iterator std::reverse_iterator <iterator> • const_reverse_iterator std::reverse_iterator <const_iterator> • size_type size_t • difference_type ptrdiff_t C++ List Member Functions • insert(): It inserts the new element before the position pointed by the iterator. • push_back(): It adds a new element at the end of the vector. • push_front(): It adds a new element to the front. • pop_back(): It deletes the last element. • pop_front(): It deletes the first element. • empty(): It checks whether the list is empty or not. • size(): It finds the number of elements present in the list. • max_size(): It finds the maximum size of the list. • front(): It returns the first element of the list. • back(): It returns the last element of the list. • swap(): It swaps two list when the type of both the list are same. • reverse(): It reverses the elements of the list. • sort(): It sorts the elements of the list in an increasing order. • merge(): It merges the two sorted list. • splice(): It inserts a new list into the invoking list. • unique(): It removes all the duplicate elements from the list. • resize(): It changes the size of the list container. • assign(): It assigns a new element to the list container. • emplace(): It inserts a new element at a specified position. • emplace_back(): It inserts a new element at the end of the vector. • emplace_front(): It inserts a new element at the beginning of the list. Non-member overloaded functions operator== Tests whether two lists are equal or not. 2 operator!= Tests whether two lists are equal or not. 3 operator< Tests whether first list is less than other or not. 4 operator<= Tests whether first list is less than or equal to other or not. 5 operator> Tests whether first list is greater than other or not. 6 operator>= Tests whether first list is greater than or equal to other or not. 7 swap Exchanges the contents of two list.
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/* using lists in C++ language simple code example */ #include <iostream> #include <list> using namespace std; int main(void) { list<int> l; list<int> l1 = { 10, 20, 30 }; list<int> l2(l1.begin(), l1.end()); list<int> l3(move(l1)); cout << "Size of list l: " << l.size() << endl; cout << "List l2 contents: " << endl; for (auto it = l2.begin(); it != l2.end(); ++it) cout << *it << endl; cout << "List l3 contents: " << endl; for (auto it = l3.begin(); it != l3.end(); ++it) cout << *it << endl; return 0; }
Classes and Objects in C++ Language
The main purpose of C++ programming is to add object orientation to the C programming language and classes are the central feature of C++ that supports object-oriented programming and are often called user-defined types. A class is used to specify the form of an object and it combines data representation and methods for manipulating that data into one neat package. The data and functions within a class are called members of the class.
C++ Class Definitions
When you define a class, you define a blueprint for a data type. This doesn't actually define any data, but it does define what the class name means, that is, what an object of the class will consist of and what operations can be performed on such an object. A class definition starts with the keyword class followed by the class name; and the class body, enclosed by a pair of curly braces. A class definition must be followed either by a semicolon or a list of declarations. For example, we defined the Box data type using the keyword class as follows:
class Box { public: double length; // Length of a box double breadth; // Breadth of a box double height; // Height of a box };
The keyword public determines the access attributes of the members of the class that follows it. A public member can be accessed from outside the class anywhere within the scope of the class object. You can also specify the members of a class as private or protected which we will discuss in a sub-section.
Define C++ Objects
A class provides the blueprints for objects, so basically an object is created from a class. We declare objects of a class with exactly the same sort of declaration that we declare variables of basic types. Following statements declare two objects of class Box:
Box Box1; // Declare Box1 of type Box Box Box2; // Declare Box2 of type Box
Both of the objects Box1 and Box2 will have their own copy of data members.
Accessing the Data Members
The public data members of objects of a class can be accessed using the direct member access operator (.). It is important to note that private and protected members can not be accessed directly using direct member access operator (.).
Classes and Objects in Detail
There are further interesting concepts related to C++ Classes and Objects which we will discuss in various sub-sections listed below: • Class Member Functions: A member function of a class is a function that has its definition or its prototype within the class definition like any other variable. • Class Access Modifiers: A class member can be defined as public, private or protected. By default members would be assumed as private. • Constructor & Destructor: A class constructor is a special function in a class that is called when a new object of the class is created. A destructor is also a special function which is called when created object is deleted. • Copy Constructor: The copy constructor is a constructor which creates an object by initializing it with an object of the same class, which has been created previously. • Friend Functions: A friend function is permitted full access to private and protected members of a class. • Inline Functions: With an inline function, the compiler tries to expand the code in the body of the function in place of a call to the function. • this Pointer: Every object has a special pointer this which points to the object itself. • Pointer to C++ Classes: A pointer to a class is done exactly the same way a pointer to a structure is. In fact a class is really just a structure with functions in it. • Static Members of a Class: Both data members and function members of a class can be declared as static.
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/* using public and private in C++ Class */ // Program to illustrate the working of // public and private in C++ Class #include <iostream> using namespace std; class Room { private: double length; double breadth; double height; public: // function to initialize private variables void initData(double len, double brth, double hgt) { length = len; breadth = brth; height = hgt; } double calculateArea() { return length * breadth; } double calculateVolume() { return length * breadth * height; } }; int main() { // create object of Room class Room room1; // pass the values of private variables as arguments room1.initData(42.5, 30.8, 19.2); cout << "Area of Room = " << room1.calculateArea() << endl; cout << "Volume of Room = " << room1.calculateVolume() << endl; return 0; }
List Library pop_front() Function in C++
Delete first element. Removes the first element in the list container, effectively reducing its size by one. pop_front() is an inbuilt function in C++ STL which is declared in header file. pop_front() is used to pop (delete) the element from the beginning of the list container. The function deletes the first element of the list container, means the second element of the container becomes the first element and the first element from the container is removed from the container. This function decreases the size of the container by 1. This destroys the removed element. pop_front() is an inbuilt function in C++ STL which is declared in header file. pop_front() is used to pop (delete) the element from the beginning of the list container. The function deletes the first element of the list container, means the second element of the container becomes the first element and the first element from the container is removed from the container. This function decreases the size of the container by 1.
Syntax for List pop_front() Function in C++
#include <list> void pop_front();
This function does not accept any parameter. This function returns nothing, just removes/pops the first element from the container.
Complexity
Constant
Iterator validity
Iterators, pointers and references referring to the element removed by the function are invalidated. All other iterators, pointers and reference keep their validity.
Data races
The container is modified. The first element is modified. Concurrently accessing or modifying other elements is safe.
Exception safety
If the container is not empty, the function never throws exceptions (no-throw guarantee). Otherwise, it causes undefined behavior.
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/* The list::pop_front() is a built-in function in C++ STL which is used to remove an element from the front of a list container. This function thus decreases the size of the container by 1 as it deletes the element from the front of a list. */ /* remove the first element from the list and therefore, reducing the size of the list by one with C++ List pop_front() function code example. */ #include <bits/stdc++.h> using namespace std; int main(){ //create a list list<int> myList; //inserting elements to the list myList.push_back(1); myList.push_back(2); myList.push_back(3); myList.push_back(4); //List before applying pop_front() function cout<<"List contains : "; for(auto i = myList.begin(); i != myList.end(); i++) cout << *i << " "; //removing first element using pop_front() myList.pop_front(); // List after removing element from front cout<<"\nList after removing an element from front: "; for (auto i = myList.begin(); i != myList.end(); i++) cout << *i << " "; return 0; }
this Pointer in C++
Every object in C++ has access to its own address through an important pointer called this pointer. The this pointer is an implicit parameter to all member functions. Therefore, inside a member function, this may be used to refer to the invoking object. Friend functions do not have a this pointer, because friends are not members of a class. Only member functions have a this pointer. In C++ programming, this is a keyword that refers to the current instance of the class. There can be 3 main usage of this keyword in C++: • It can be used to pass current object as a parameter to another method. • It can be used to refer current class instance variable. • It can be used to declare indexers. To understand 'this' pointer, it is important to know how objects look at functions and data members of a class. • Each object gets its own copy of the data member. • All-access the same function definition as present in the code segment. Meaning each object gets its own copy of data members and all objects share a single copy of member functions. Then now question is that if only one copy of each member function exists and is used by multiple objects, how are the proper data members are accessed and updated? The compiler supplies an implicit pointer along with the names of the functions as 'this'. The 'this' pointer is passed as a hidden argument to all nonstatic member function calls and is available as a local variable within the body of all nonstatic functions. 'this' pointer is not available in static member functions as static member functions can be called without any object (with class name). For a class X, the type of this pointer is 'X* '. Also, if a member function of X is declared as const, then the type of this pointer is 'const X *'
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/* The this pointer holds the address of current object, in simple words you can say that this pointer points to the current object of the class. The keyword this identifies a special type of pointer. Suppose that you create an object named x of class A, and class A has a nonstatic member function f(). If you call the function x.f(), the keyword this in the body of f() stores the address of x. You cannot declare the this pointer or make assignments to it. A static member function does not have a this pointer.*/ #include <iostream> using namespace std; class Box { public: // Constructor definition Box(double l = 2.0, double b = 2.0, double h = 2.0) { cout <<"Constructor called." << endl; length = l; breadth = b; height = h; } double Volume() { return length * breadth * height; } int compare(Box box) { return this->Volume() > box.Volume(); } private: double length; // Length of a box double breadth; // Breadth of a box double height; // Height of a box }; int main(void) { Box Box1(3.3, 1.2, 1.5); // Declare box1 Box Box2(8.5, 6.0, 2.0); // Declare box2 if(Box1.compare(Box2)) { cout << "Box2 is smaller than Box1" <<endl; } else { cout << "Box2 is equal to or larger than Box1" <<endl; } return 0; }
main() Function in C++
A program shall contain a global function named main, which is the designated start of the program in hosted environment. main() function is the entry point of any C++ program. It is the point at which execution of program is started. When a C++ program is executed, the execution control goes directly to the main() function. Every C++ program have a main() function.
Syntax for main() Function in C++
void main() { ............ ............ }
void
void is a keyword in C++ language, void means nothing, whenever we use void as a function return type then that function nothing return. here main() function no return any value.
main
main is a name of function which is predefined function in C++ library. In place of void we can also use int return type of main() function, at that time main() return integer type value. 1) It cannot be used anywhere in the program a) in particular, it cannot be called recursively b) its address cannot be taken 2) It cannot be predefined and cannot be overloaded: effectively, the name main in the global namespace is reserved for functions (although it can be used to name classes, namespaces, enumerations, and any entity in a non-global namespace, except that a function called "main" cannot be declared with C language linkage in any namespace). 3) It cannot be defined as deleted or (since C++11) declared with C language linkage, constexpr (since C++11), consteval (since C++20), inline, or static. 4) The body of the main function does not need to contain the return statement: if control reaches the end of main without encountering a return statement, the effect is that of executing return 0;. 5) Execution of the return (or the implicit return upon reaching the end of main) is equivalent to first leaving the function normally (which destroys the objects with automatic storage duration) and then calling std::exit with the same argument as the argument of the return. (std::exit then destroys static objects and terminates the program). 6) (since C++14) The return type of the main function cannot be deduced (auto main() {... is not allowed). 7) (since C++20) The main function cannot be a coroutine.
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/* simple code example by main() function in C++ */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int day = 4; switch (day) { case 1: cout << "Monday"; break; case 2: cout << "Tuesday"; break; case 3: cout << "Wednesday"; break; case 4: cout << "Thursday"; break; case 5: cout << "Friday"; break; case 6: cout << "Saturday"; break; case 7: cout << "Sunday"; break; } return 0; }
Constructors in C++ Language
In C++, constructor is a special method which is invoked automatically at the time of object creation. It is used to initialize the data members of new object generally. The constructor in C++ has the same name as class or structure. Constructors are special class functions which performs initialization of every object. The Compiler calls the Constructor whenever an object is created. Constructors initialize values to object members after storage is allocated to the object. Whereas, Destructor on the other hand is used to destroy the class object. • Default Constructor: A constructor which has no argument is known as default constructor. It is invoked at the time of creating object.
Syntax for Default Constructor in C++
class_name(parameter1, parameter2, ...) { // constructor Definition }
• Parameterized Constructor: In C++, a constructor with parameters is known as a parameterized constructor. This is the preferred method to initialize member data. These are the constructors with parameter. Using this Constructor you can provide different values to data members of different objects, by passing the appropriate values as argument.
Syntax for Parameterized Constructor in C++
class class_name { public: class_name(variables) //Parameterized constructor declared. { } };
• Copy Constructors: These are special type of Constructors which takes an object as argument, and is used to copy values of data members of one object into other object.
Syntax for Copy Constructors in C++
classname (const classname &obj) { // body of constructor }
The copy constructor is a constructor which creates an object by initializing it with an object of the same class, which has been created previously. The copy constructor is used to - • Initialize one object from another of the same type. • Copy an object to pass it as an argument to a function. • Copy an object to return it from a function. If a copy constructor is not defined in a class, the compiler itself defines one.If the class has pointer variables and has some dynamic memory allocations, then it is a must to have a copy constructor. The most common form of copy constructor is shown here.
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/* A constructor is a special type of member function that is called automatically when an object is created. In C++, a constructor has the same name as that of the class and it does not have a return type. */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; // declare a class class Wall { private: double length; double height; public: // initialize variables with parameterized constructor Wall(double len, double hgt) { length = len; height = hgt; } // copy constructor with a Wall object as parameter // copies data of the obj parameter Wall(Wall &obj) { length = obj.length; height = obj.height; } double calculateArea() { return length * height; } }; int main() { // create an object of Wall class Wall wall1(10.5, 8.6); // copy contents of wall1 to wall2 Wall wall2 = wall1; // print areas of wall1 and wall2 cout << "Area of Wall 1: " << wall1.calculateArea() << endl; cout << "Area of Wall 2: " << wall2.calculateArea(); return 0; }
While Loop Statement in C++
In while loop, condition is evaluated first and if it returns true then the statements inside while loop execute, this happens repeatedly until the condition returns false. When condition returns false, the control comes out of loop and jumps to the next statement in the program after while loop. The important point to note when using while loop is that we need to use increment or decrement statement inside while loop so that the loop variable gets changed on each iteration, and at some point condition returns false. This way we can end the execution of while loop otherwise the loop would execute indefinitely. A while loop that never stops is said to be the infinite while loop, when we give the condition in such a way so that it never returns false, then the loops becomes infinite and repeats itself indefinitely.
Syntax for While Loop Statement in C++
while (condition) { // body of the loop }
• A while loop evaluates the condition • If the condition evaluates to true, the code inside the while loop is executed. • The condition is evaluated again. • This process continues until the condition is false. • When the condition evaluates to false, the loop terminates. Do not forget to increase the variable used in the condition, otherwise the loop will never end!
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/* While Loop Statement in C++ language */ // program to find the sum of positive numbers // if the user enters a negative number, the loop ends // the negative number entered is not added to the sum #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int number; int sum = 0; // take input from the user cout << "Enter a number: "; cin >> number; while (number >= 0) { // add all positive numbers sum += number; // take input again if the number is positive cout << "Enter a number: "; cin >> number; } // display the sum cout << "\nThe sum is " << sum << endl; return 0; }
Pointers in C++ Language
The pointer in C++ language is a variable, it is also known as locator or indicator that points to an address of a value. In C++, a pointer refers to a variable that holds the address of another variable. Like regular variables, pointers have a data type. For example, a pointer of type integer can hold the address of a variable of type integer. A pointer of character type can hold the address of a variable of character type. You should see a pointer as a symbolic representation of a memory address. With pointers, programs can simulate call-by-reference. They can also create and manipulate dynamic data structures. In C++, a pointer variable refers to a variable pointing to a specific address in a memory pointed by another variable.
Syntax for Pointers in C++
int *ip; // pointer to an integer double *dp; // pointer to a double float *fp; // pointer to a float char *ch // pointer to character
• Pointer reduces the code and improves the performance, it is used to retrieving strings, trees etc. and used with arrays, structures and functions. • We can return multiple values from function using pointer. • It makes you able to access any memory location in the computer's memory. Dynamic memory allocation: In c language, we can dynamically allocate memory using malloc() and calloc() functions where pointer is used. Arrays, Functions and Structures: Pointers in C language are widely used in arrays, functions and structures. It reduces the code and improves the performance. & (ampersand sign): Address operator - Determine the address of a variable. * (asterisk sign): Indirection operator - Access the value of an address. The pointer in C++ language can be declared using * (asterisk symbol).
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/* pointer is a variable in C++ that holds the address of another variable */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main () { int var = 20; // actual variable declaration. int *ip; // pointer variable ip = &var; // store address of var in pointer variable cout << "Value of var variable: "; cout << var << endl; // print the address stored in ip pointer variable cout << "Address stored in ip variable: "; cout << ip << endl; // access the value at the address available in pointer cout << "Value of *ip variable: "; cout << *ip << endl; return 0; }
List Library push_back() Function in C++
Add element at the end. Adds a new element at the end of the list container, after its current last element. The content of val is copied (or moved) to the new element. This effectively increases the container size by one. The list:push_back() function in C++ STL is used to add a new element to an existing list container. It takes the element to be added as a parameter and adds it to the list container.
Syntax for List push_back() Function in C++
#include <list> void push_back (const value_type& val); void push_back (value_type&& val);
val
Value to be copied (or moved) to the new element. Member type value_type is the type of the elements in the container, defined in list as an alias of its first template parameter (T). This function accepts a single parameter which is mandatory value. This refers to the element needed to be added to the list, list_name. This function does not return any value. The storage for the new elements is allocated using the container's allocator, which may throw exceptions on failure (for the default allocator, bad_alloc is thrown if the allocation request does not succeed).
Complexity
Constant
Iterator validity
No changes
Data races
The container is modified. No existing contained elements are accessed: concurrently accessing or modifying them is safe.
Exception safety
Strong guarantee: if an exception is thrown, there are no changes in the container. If allocator_traits::construct is not supported with val as argument, it causes undefined behavior.
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/* list::push_back() function is used to push elements into a list from the back. The new value is inserted into the list at the end, after the current last element and the container size is increased by 1.*/ // CPP program code example to illustrate application Of push_back() function #include <iostream> #include <list> using namespace std; int main() { list<int> mylist{}; mylist.push_back(7); mylist.push_back(89); mylist.push_back(45); mylist.push_back(6); mylist.push_back(24); mylist.push_back(58); mylist.push_back(43); // list becomes 7, 89, 45, 6, 24, 58, 43 // Sorting function mylist.sort(); for (auto it = mylist.begin(); it != mylist.end(); ++it) cout << ' ' << *it; }
Nested Loop Statement in C++
C supports nesting of loops in C. Nesting of loops is the feature in C that allows the looping of statements inside another loop. Any number of loops can be defined inside another loop, i.e., there is no restriction for defining any number of loops. The nesting level can be defined at n times. You can define any type of loop inside another loop; for example, you can define 'while' loop inside a 'for' loop. A loop inside another loop is called a nested loop. The depth of nested loop depends on the complexity of a problem. We can have any number of nested loops as required. Consider a nested loop where the outer loop runs n times and consists of another loop inside it. The inner loop runs m times. Then, the total number of times the inner loop runs during the program execution is n*m.
Syntax for Nested Loop Statement in C++
Outer_loop { Inner_loop { // inner loop statements. } // outer loop statements. }
Outer_loop and Inner_loop are the valid loops that can be a 'for' loop, 'while' loop or 'do-while' loop.
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/* nested loop statement in C++ language */ // C++ program that uses nested for loop to print a 2D matrix #include <bits/stdc++.h> using namespace std; #define ROW 3 #define COL 3 // Driver program int main() { int i, j; // Declare the matrix int matrix[ROW][COL] = { { 4, 8, 12 }, { 16, 20, 24 }, { 28, 32, 36 } }; cout << "Given matrix is \n"; // Print the matrix using nested loops for (i = 0; i < ROW; i++) { for (j = 0; j < COL; j++) cout << matrix[i][j]; cout << "\n"; } return 0; }
If Else Statement in C++
In computer programming, we use the if statement to run a block code only when a certain condition is met. An if statement can be followed by an optional else statement, which executes when the boolean expression is false. There are three forms of if...else statements in C++: • if statement, • if...else statement, • if...else if...else statement,
Syntax for If Statement in C++
if (condition) { // body of if statement }
The if statement evaluates the condition inside the parentheses ( ). If the condition evaluates to true, the code inside the body of if is executed. If the condition evaluates to false, the code inside the body of if is skipped.
Syntax for If...Else Statement
if (condition) { // block of code if condition is true } else { // block of code if condition is false }
The if..else statement evaluates the condition inside the parenthesis. If the condition evaluates true, the code inside the body of if is executed, the code inside the body of else is skipped from execution. If the condition evaluates false, the code inside the body of else is executed, the code inside the body of if is skipped from execution. The if...else statement is used to execute a block of code among two alternatives. However, if we need to make a choice between more than two alternatives, we use the if...else if...else statement.
Syntax for If...Else...Else If Statement in C++
if (condition1) { // code block 1 } else if (condition2){ // code block 2 } else { // code block 3 }
• If condition1 evaluates to true, the code block 1 is executed. • If condition1 evaluates to false, then condition2 is evaluated. • If condition2 is true, the code block 2 is executed. • If condition2 is false, the code block 3 is executed. There can be more than one else if statement but only one if and else statements. In C/C++ if-else-if ladder helps user decide from among multiple options. The C/C++ if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the C else-if ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
Syntax for If Else If Ladder in C++
if (condition) statement 1; else if (condition) statement 2; . . else statement;
Working of the if-else-if ladder: 1. Control falls into the if block. 2. The flow jumps to Condition 1. 3. Condition is tested. If Condition yields true, goto Step 4. If Condition yields false, goto Step 5. 4. The present block is executed. Goto Step 7. 5. The flow jumps to Condition 2. If Condition yields true, goto step 4. If Condition yields false, goto Step 6. 6. The flow jumps to Condition 3. If Condition yields true, goto step 4. If Condition yields false, execute else block. Goto Step 7. 7. Exits the if-else-if ladder. • The if else ladder statement in C++ programming language is used to check set of conditions in sequence. • This is useful when we want to selectively executes one code block(out of many) based on certain conditions. • It allows us to check for multiple condition expressions and execute different code blocks for more than two conditions. • A condition expression is tested only when all previous if conditions in if-else ladder is false. • If any of the conditional expression evaluates to true, then it will execute the corresponding code block and exits whole if-else ladder.
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/* If Else Statement in C++ Language */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main () { // local variable declaration: int a = 100; // check the boolean condition if( a < 20 ) { // if condition is true then print the following cout << "a is less than 20;" << endl; } else { // if condition is false then print the following cout << "a is not less than 20;" << endl; } cout << "value of a is : " << a << endl; return 0; }
Namespaces in C++ Language
Consider a situation, when we have two persons with the same name, jhon, in the same class. Whenever we need to differentiate them definitely we would have to use some additional information along with their name, like either the area, if they live in different area or their mother's or father's name, etc. Same situation can arise in your C++ applications. For example, you might be writing some code that has a function called xyz() and there is another library available which is also having same function xyz(). Now the compiler has no way of knowing which version of xyz() function you are referring to within your code. A namespace is designed to overcome this difficulty and is used as additional information to differentiate similar functions, classes, variables etc. with the same name available in different libraries. Using namespace, you can define the context in which names are defined. In essence, a namespace defines a scope.
Defining a Namespace
A namespace definition begins with the keyword namespace followed by the namespace name as follows:
namespace namespace_name { // code declarations }
To call the namespace-enabled version of either function or variable, prepend (::) the namespace name as follows:
name::code; // code could be variable or function.
Using Directive
You can also avoid prepending of namespaces with the using namespace directive. This directive tells the compiler that the subsequent code is making use of names in the specified namespace.
Discontiguous Namespaces
A namespace can be defined in several parts and so a namespace is made up of the sum of its separately defined parts. The separate parts of a namespace can be spread over multiple files. So, if one part of the namespace requires a name defined in another file, that name must still be declared. Writing a following namespace definition either defines a new namespace or adds new elements to an existing one:
namespace namespace_name { // code declarations }
Nested Namespaces
Namespaces can be nested where you can define one namespace inside another name space as follows:
namespace namespace_name1 { // code declarations namespace namespace_name2 { // code declarations } }
• Namespace is a feature added in C++ and not present in C. • A namespace is a declarative region that provides a scope to the identifiers (names of the types, function, variables etc) inside it. • Multiple namespace blocks with the same name are allowed. All declarations within those blocks are declared in the named scope. • Namespace declarations appear only at global scope. • Namespace declarations can be nested within another namespace. • Namespace declarations don't have access specifiers. (Public or private) • No need to give semicolon after the closing brace of definition of namespace. • We can split the definition of namespace over several units.
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/* namespaces in C++ language */ // A C++ code to demonstrate that we can define // methods outside namespace. #include <iostream> using namespace std; // Creating a namespace namespace ns { void display(); class happy { public: void display(); }; } // Defining methods of namespace void ns::happy::display() { cout << "ns::happy::display()\n"; } void ns::display() { cout << "ns::display()\n"; } // Driver code int main() { ns::happy obj; ns::display(); obj.display(); return 0; }


Return the least recently inserted item in the queue or throw "Underflow" if empty. Return and remove the least "recently inserted" item from the queue. "Throw Underflow" if empty.
In this c++ program, user enter two numbers ('floating point numbers'). Then, the product of those two numbers is 'stored' in a variable and displayed on the screen. The 2 numbers
To find the length of the string in 'C++', ask to enter the string and then Find the Length the that string using function "strlen()" of string.h library and display the length value of a string