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C++ Programming Code Examples

C++ > Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++ Code Examples

Buggy IntCell class implementation

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/* Buggy IntCell class implementation */ #include <iostream.h> class IntCell { public: explicit IntCell( int initialValue = 0 ) { storedValue = new int( initialValue ); } int read( ) const { return *storedValue; } void write( int x ) { *storedValue = x; } private: int *storedValue; }; int f( ) { IntCell a( 2 ); IntCell b = a; IntCell c; c = b; a.write( 4 ); cout << a.read( ) << endl << b.read( ) << endl << c.read( ) << endl; return 0; } int main( ) { f( ); return 0; }
#include Directive in C++
#include is a way of including a standard or user-defined file in the program and is mostly written at the beginning of any C/C++ program. This directive is read by the preprocessor and orders it to insert the content of a user-defined or system header file into the following program. These files are mainly imported from an outside source into the current program. The process of importing such files that might be system-defined or user-defined is known as File Inclusion. This type of preprocessor directive tells the compiler to include a file in the source code program.
Syntax for #include Directive in C++
#include "user-defined_file"
Including using " ": When using the double quotes(" "), the preprocessor access the current directory in which the source "header_file" is located. This type is mainly used to access any header files of the user's program or user-defined files.
#include <header_file>
Including using <>: While importing file using angular brackets(<>), the the preprocessor uses a predetermined directory path to access the file. It is mainly used to access system header files located in the standard system directories. Header File or Standard files: This is a file which contains C/C++ function declarations and macro definitions to be shared between several source files. Functions like the printf(), scanf(), cout, cin and various other input-output or other standard functions are contained within different header files. So to utilise those functions, the users need to import a few header files which define the required functions. User-defined files: These files resembles the header files, except for the fact that they are written and defined by the user itself. This saves the user from writing a particular function multiple times. Once a user-defined file is written, it can be imported anywhere in the program using the #include preprocessor. • In #include directive, comments are not recognized. So in case of #include <a//b>, a//b is treated as filename. • In #include directive, backslash is considered as normal text not escape sequence. So in case of #include <a\nb>, a\nb is treated as filename. • You can use only comment after filename otherwise it will give error.
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/* using #include directive in C language */ #include <stdio.h> int main() { /* * C standard library printf function * defined in the stdio.h header file */ printf("I love you Clementine"); printf("I love you so much"); printf("HappyCodings"); return 0; }
Return Statement in C++
A return statement ends the processing of the current function and returns control to the caller of the function. A value-returning function should include a return statement, containing an expression. If an expression is not given on a return statement in a function declared with a non-void return type, the compiler issues an error message. If the data type of the expression is different from the function return type, conversion of the return value takes place as if the value of the expression were assigned to an object with the same function return type.
Syntax for Return Statement in C++
return[expression];
For a function of return type void, a return statement is not strictly necessary. If the end of such a function is reached without encountering a return statement, control is passed to the caller as if a return statement without an expression were encountered. In other words, an implicit return takes place upon completion of the final statement, and control automatically returns to the calling function. If a return statement is used, it must not contain an expression. The following are examples of return statements:
return; /* Returns no value */ return result; /* Returns the value of result */ return 1; /* Returns the value 1 */ return (x * x); /* Returns the value of x * x */
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/* illustrate Methods returning a value using return statement in C++ code example */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; // non-void return type // function to calculate sum int SUM(int a, int b) { int s1 = a + b; // method using the return // statement to return a value return s1; } // Driver method int main() { int num1 = 10; int num2 = 10; int sum_of = SUM(num1, num2); cout << "The sum is " << sum_of; return 0; }
main() Function in C++
A program shall contain a global function named main, which is the designated start of the program in hosted environment. main() function is the entry point of any C++ program. It is the point at which execution of program is started. When a C++ program is executed, the execution control goes directly to the main() function. Every C++ program have a main() function.
Syntax for main() Function in C++
void main() { ............ ............ }
void
void is a keyword in C++ language, void means nothing, whenever we use void as a function return type then that function nothing return. here main() function no return any value.
main
main is a name of function which is predefined function in C++ library. In place of void we can also use int return type of main() function, at that time main() return integer type value. 1) It cannot be used anywhere in the program a) in particular, it cannot be called recursively b) its address cannot be taken 2) It cannot be predefined and cannot be overloaded: effectively, the name main in the global namespace is reserved for functions (although it can be used to name classes, namespaces, enumerations, and any entity in a non-global namespace, except that a function called "main" cannot be declared with C language linkage in any namespace). 3) It cannot be defined as deleted or (since C++11) declared with C language linkage, constexpr (since C++11), consteval (since C++20), inline, or static. 4) The body of the main function does not need to contain the return statement: if control reaches the end of main without encountering a return statement, the effect is that of executing return 0;. 5) Execution of the return (or the implicit return upon reaching the end of main) is equivalent to first leaving the function normally (which destroys the objects with automatic storage duration) and then calling std::exit with the same argument as the argument of the return. (std::exit then destroys static objects and terminates the program). 6) (since C++14) The return type of the main function cannot be deduced (auto main() {... is not allowed). 7) (since C++20) The main function cannot be a coroutine.
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/* simple code example by main() function in C++ */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int day = 4; switch (day) { case 1: cout << "Monday"; break; case 2: cout << "Tuesday"; break; case 3: cout << "Wednesday"; break; case 4: cout << "Thursday"; break; case 5: cout << "Friday"; break; case 6: cout << "Saturday"; break; case 7: cout << "Sunday"; break; } return 0; }
Standard Output Stream (cout) in C++
The cout is a predefined object of ostream class. It is connected with the standard output device, which is usually a display screen. The cout is used in conjunction with stream insertion operator (<<) to display the output on a console. On most program environments, the standard output by default is the screen, and the C++ stream object defined to access it is cout.
Syntax for cout in C++
cout << var_name; //or cout << "Some String";
The syntax of the cout object in C++: cout << var_name; Or cout << "Some String";
<<
is the insertion operator
var_name
is usually a variable, but can also be an array element or elements of containers like vectors, lists, maps, etc. The "c" in cout refers to "character" and "out" means "output". Hence cout means "character output". The cout object is used along with the insertion operator << in order to display a stream of characters. The << operator can be used more than once with a combination of variables, strings, and manipulators. cout is used for displaying data on the screen. The operator << called as insertion operator or put to operator. The Insertion operator can be overloaded. Insertion operator is similar to the printf() operation in C. cout is the object of ostream class. Data flow direction is from variable to output device. Multiple outputs can be displayed using cout.
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/* standard output stream (cout) in C++ language */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { string str = "Do not interrupt me"; char ch = 'm'; // use cout with write() cout.write(str,6); cout << endl; // use cout with put() cout.put(ch); return 0; }
Assignment Operators in C++
As the name already suggests, these operators help in assigning values to variables. These operators help us in allocating a particular value to the operands. The main simple assignment operator is '='. We have to be sure that both the left and right sides of the operator must have the same data type. We have different levels of operators. Assignment operators are used to assign the value, variable and function to another variable. Assignment operators in C are some of the C Programming Operator, which are useful to assign the values to the declared variables. Let's discuss the various types of the assignment operators such as =, +=, -=, /=, *= and %=. The following table lists the assignment operators supported by the C language:
=
Simple assignment operator. Assigns values from right side operands to left side operand
+=
Add AND assignment operator. It adds the right operand to the left operand and assign the result to the left operand.
-=
Subtract AND assignment operator. It subtracts the right operand from the left operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
*=
Multiply AND assignment operator. It multiplies the right operand with the left operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
/=
Divide AND assignment operator. It divides the left operand with the right operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
%=
Modulus AND assignment operator. It takes modulus using two operands and assigns the result to the left operand.
<<=
Left shift AND assignment operator.
>>=
Right shift AND assignment operator.
&=
Bitwise AND assignment operator.
^=
Bitwise exclusive OR and assignment operator.
|=
Bitwise inclusive OR and assignment operator.
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/* Assignment operators are used to assigning value to a variable. The left side operand of the assignment operator is a variable and right side operand of the assignment operator is a value. The value on the right side must be of the same data-type of the variable on the left side otherwise the compiler will raise an error. */ // C++ program to demonstrate working of Assignment operators #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { // Assigning value 10 to a // using "=" operator int a = 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by adding 10 to a // using "+=" operator a += 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by subtracting 10 from a // using "-=" operator a -= 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by multiplying 10 to a // using "*=" operator a *= 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by dividing 10 from a // using "/=" operator a /= 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; return 0; }
Memory Management new Operator in C++
Allocate storage space. Default allocation functions (single-object form). A new operator is used to create the object while a delete operator is used to delete the object. When the object is created by using the new operator, then the object will exist until we explicitly use the delete operator to delete the object. Therefore, we can say that the lifetime of the object is not related to the block structure of the program.
Syntax for new Operator in C++
#include <new> //throwing (1) void* operator new (std::size_t size); //nothrow (2) void* operator new (std::size_t size, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_value) noexcept; //placement (3) void* operator new (std::size_t size, void* ptr) noexcept;
size
Size in bytes of the requested memory block. This is the size of the type specifier in the new-expression when called automatically by such an expression. If this argument is zero, the function still returns a distinct non-null pointer on success (although dereferencing this pointer leads to undefined behavior). size_t is an integral type.
nothrow_value
The constant nothrow. This parameter is only used to distinguish it from the first version with an overloaded version. When the nothrow constant is passed as second parameter to operator new, operator new returns a null-pointer on failure instead of throwing a bad_alloc exception. nothrow_t is the type of constant nothrow.
ptr
A pointer to an already-allocated memory block of the proper size. If called by a new-expression, the object is initialized (or constructed) at this location. For the first and second versions, function returns a pointer to the newly allocated storage space. For the third version, ptr is returned. • (1) throwing allocation: Allocates size bytes of storage, suitably aligned to represent any object of that size, and returns a non-null pointer to the first byte of this block. On failure, it throws a bad_alloc exception. • (2) nothrow allocation: Same as above (1), except that on failure it returns a null pointer instead of throwing an exception. The default definition allocates memory by calling the the first version: ::operator new (size). If replaced, both the first and second versions shall return pointers with identical properties. • (3) placement: Simply returns ptr (no storage is allocated). Notice though that, if the function is called by a new-expression, the proper initialization will be performed (for class objects, this includes calling its default constructor). The default allocation and deallocation functions are special components of the standard library; They have the following unique properties: • Global: All three versions of operator new are declared in the global namespace, not within the std namespace. • Implicit: The allocating versions ((1) and (2)) are implicitly declared in every translation unit of a C++ program, no matter whether header <new> is included or not. • Replaceable: The allocating versions ((1) and (2)) are also replaceable: A program may provide its own definition that replaces the one provided by default to produce the result described above, or can overload it for specific types. If set_new_handler has been used to define a new_handler function, this new-handler function is called by the default definitions of the allocating versions ((1) and (2)) if they fail to allocate the requested storage. operator new can be called explicitly as a regular function, but in C++, new is an operator with a very specific behavior: An expression with the new operator, first calls function operator new (i.e., this function) with the size of its type specifier as first argument, and if this is successful, it then automatically initializes or constructs the object (if needed). Finally, the expression evaluates as a pointer to the appropriate type.
Data races
Modifies the storage referenced by the returned value. Calls to allocation and deallocation functions that reuse the same unit of storage shall occur in a single total order where each deallocation happens entirely before the next allocation. This shall also apply to the observable behavior of custom replacements for this function.
Exception safety
The first version (1) throws bad_alloc if it fails to allocate storage. Otherwise, it throws no exceptions (no-throw guarantee).
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/* C++ allows us to allocate the memory of a variable or an array in run time. This is known as dynamic memory allocation. The new operator denotes a request for memory allocation on the Free Store. If sufficient memory is available, new operator initializes the memory and returns the address of the newly allocated and initialized memory to the pointer variable. */ /* Allocate storage space by operator new */ // C++ program code example to illustrate dynamic allocation and deallocation of memory using new and delete #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main () { // Pointer initialization to null int* p = NULL; // Request memory for the variable // using new operator p = new(nothrow) int; if (!p) cout << "allocation of memory failed\n"; else { // Store value at allocated address *p = 29; cout << "Value of p: " << *p << endl; } // Request block of memory // using new operator float *r = new float(75.25); cout << "Value of r: " << *r << endl; // Request block of memory of size n int n = 5; int *q = new(nothrow) int[n]; if (!q) cout << "allocation of memory failed\n"; else { for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) q[i] = i+1; cout << "Value store in block of memory: "; for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) cout << q[i] << " "; } // freed the allocated memory delete p; delete r; // freed the block of allocated memory delete[] q; return 0; }
write() Function in C++
Write block of data. Inserts the first n characters of the array pointed by s into the stream. This function simply copies a block of data, without checking its contents: The array may contain null characters, which are also copied without stopping the copying process. Internally, the function accesses the output sequence by first constructing a sentry object. Then (if good), it inserts character into its associated stream buffer object as if calling its member function sputc until n characters have been written or until an insertion fails (in this case it sets the badbit flag). Finally, it destroys the sentry object before returning.
Syntax for write() Function in C++
#include <fstream> ostream& write (const char* s, streamsize n);
s
Pointer to an array of at least n characters.
n
Number of characters to insert. Integer value of type streamsize representing the size in characters of the block of data to write. streamsize is a signed integral type. Function returns the ostream object (*this). Errors are signaled by modifying the internal state flags: • eofbit: - • failbit: May be set if the construction of sentry failed. • badbit: Either an insertion on the stream failed, or some other error happened (such as when this function catches an exception thrown by an internal operation). When set, the integrity of the stream may have been affected. Multiple flags may be set by a single operation. If the operation sets an internal state flag that was registered with member exceptions, the function throws an exception of member type failure.
Data races
Access up to n characters pointed by s. Modifies the stream object. Concurrent access to the same stream object may cause data races, except for the standard stream objects (cout, cerr, clog) when these are synchronized with stdio (in this case, no data races are initiated, although no guarantees are given on the order in which characters from multiple threads are inserted).
Exception safety
Basic guarantee: if an exception is thrown, the object is in a valid state. It throws an exception of member type failure if the resulting error state flag is not goodbit and member exceptions was set to throw for that state. Any exception thrown by an internal operation is caught and handled by the function, setting badbit. If badbit was set on the last call to exceptions, the function rethrows the caught exception.
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/* write block of data by ostream::write function code example */ /* in order to perform a binary input/output operation using the read() and write() functions, C++ provides us a few file stream classes */ // Copy a file #include <fstream> // std::ifstream, std::ofstream int main () { std::ifstream infile ("test.txt",std::ifstream::binary); std::ofstream outfile ("new.txt",std::ofstream::binary); // get size of file infile.seekg (0,infile.end); long size = infile.tellg(); infile.seekg (0); // allocate memory for file content char* buffer = new char[size]; // read content of infile infile.read (buffer,size); // write to outfile outfile.write (buffer,size); // release dynamically-allocated memory delete[] buffer; outfile.close(); infile.close(); return 0; }
Classes and Objects in C++ Language
The main purpose of C++ programming is to add object orientation to the C programming language and classes are the central feature of C++ that supports object-oriented programming and are often called user-defined types. A class is used to specify the form of an object and it combines data representation and methods for manipulating that data into one neat package. The data and functions within a class are called members of the class.
C++ Class Definitions
When you define a class, you define a blueprint for a data type. This doesn't actually define any data, but it does define what the class name means, that is, what an object of the class will consist of and what operations can be performed on such an object. A class definition starts with the keyword class followed by the class name; and the class body, enclosed by a pair of curly braces. A class definition must be followed either by a semicolon or a list of declarations. For example, we defined the Box data type using the keyword class as follows:
class Box { public: double length; // Length of a box double breadth; // Breadth of a box double height; // Height of a box };
The keyword public determines the access attributes of the members of the class that follows it. A public member can be accessed from outside the class anywhere within the scope of the class object. You can also specify the members of a class as private or protected which we will discuss in a sub-section.
Define C++ Objects
A class provides the blueprints for objects, so basically an object is created from a class. We declare objects of a class with exactly the same sort of declaration that we declare variables of basic types. Following statements declare two objects of class Box:
Box Box1; // Declare Box1 of type Box Box Box2; // Declare Box2 of type Box
Both of the objects Box1 and Box2 will have their own copy of data members.
Accessing the Data Members
The public data members of objects of a class can be accessed using the direct member access operator (.). It is important to note that private and protected members can not be accessed directly using direct member access operator (.).
Classes and Objects in Detail
There are further interesting concepts related to C++ Classes and Objects which we will discuss in various sub-sections listed below: • Class Member Functions: A member function of a class is a function that has its definition or its prototype within the class definition like any other variable. • Class Access Modifiers: A class member can be defined as public, private or protected. By default members would be assumed as private. • Constructor & Destructor: A class constructor is a special function in a class that is called when a new object of the class is created. A destructor is also a special function which is called when created object is deleted. • Copy Constructor: The copy constructor is a constructor which creates an object by initializing it with an object of the same class, which has been created previously. • Friend Functions: A friend function is permitted full access to private and protected members of a class. • Inline Functions: With an inline function, the compiler tries to expand the code in the body of the function in place of a call to the function. • this Pointer: Every object has a special pointer this which points to the object itself. • Pointer to C++ Classes: A pointer to a class is done exactly the same way a pointer to a structure is. In fact a class is really just a structure with functions in it. • Static Members of a Class: Both data members and function members of a class can be declared as static.
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/* using public and private in C++ Class */ // Program to illustrate the working of // public and private in C++ Class #include <iostream> using namespace std; class Room { private: double length; double breadth; double height; public: // function to initialize private variables void initData(double len, double brth, double hgt) { length = len; breadth = brth; height = hgt; } double calculateArea() { return length * breadth; } double calculateVolume() { return length * breadth * height; } }; int main() { // create object of Room class Room room1; // pass the values of private variables as arguments room1.initData(42.5, 30.8, 19.2); cout << "Area of Room = " << room1.calculateArea() << endl; cout << "Volume of Room = " << room1.calculateVolume() << endl; return 0; }
Constructors in C++ Language
In C++, constructor is a special method which is invoked automatically at the time of object creation. It is used to initialize the data members of new object generally. The constructor in C++ has the same name as class or structure. Constructors are special class functions which performs initialization of every object. The Compiler calls the Constructor whenever an object is created. Constructors initialize values to object members after storage is allocated to the object. Whereas, Destructor on the other hand is used to destroy the class object. • Default Constructor: A constructor which has no argument is known as default constructor. It is invoked at the time of creating object.
Syntax for Default Constructor in C++
class_name(parameter1, parameter2, ...) { // constructor Definition }
• Parameterized Constructor: In C++, a constructor with parameters is known as a parameterized constructor. This is the preferred method to initialize member data. These are the constructors with parameter. Using this Constructor you can provide different values to data members of different objects, by passing the appropriate values as argument.
Syntax for Parameterized Constructor in C++
class class_name { public: class_name(variables) //Parameterized constructor declared. { } };
• Copy Constructors: These are special type of Constructors which takes an object as argument, and is used to copy values of data members of one object into other object.
Syntax for Copy Constructors in C++
classname (const classname &obj) { // body of constructor }
The copy constructor is a constructor which creates an object by initializing it with an object of the same class, which has been created previously. The copy constructor is used to - • Initialize one object from another of the same type. • Copy an object to pass it as an argument to a function. • Copy an object to return it from a function. If a copy constructor is not defined in a class, the compiler itself defines one.If the class has pointer variables and has some dynamic memory allocations, then it is a must to have a copy constructor. The most common form of copy constructor is shown here.
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/* A constructor is a special type of member function that is called automatically when an object is created. In C++, a constructor has the same name as that of the class and it does not have a return type. */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; // declare a class class Wall { private: double length; double height; public: // initialize variables with parameterized constructor Wall(double len, double hgt) { length = len; height = hgt; } // copy constructor with a Wall object as parameter // copies data of the obj parameter Wall(Wall &obj) { length = obj.length; height = obj.height; } double calculateArea() { return length * height; } }; int main() { // create an object of Wall class Wall wall1(10.5, 8.6); // copy contents of wall1 to wall2 Wall wall2 = wall1; // print areas of wall1 and wall2 cout << "Area of Wall 1: " << wall1.calculateArea() << endl; cout << "Area of Wall 2: " << wall2.calculateArea(); return 0; }
read() Function in C++
Read block of data. Extracts n characters from the stream and stores them in the array pointed to by s. This function simply copies a block of data, without checking its contents nor appending a null character at the end. If the input sequence runs out of characters to extract (i.e., the end-of-file is reached) before n characters have been successfully read, the array pointed to by s contains all the characters read until that point, and both the eofbit and failbit flags are set for the stream. Internally, the function accesses the input sequence by first constructing a sentry object (with noskipws set to true). Then (if good), it extracts characters from its associated stream buffer object as if calling its member functions sbumpc or sgetc, and finally destroys the sentry object before returning. The number of characters successfully read and stored by this function can be accessed by calling member gcount.
Syntax for read() Function in C++
#include <fstream> istream& read (char* s, streamsize n);
s
Pointer to an array where the extracted characters are stored.
n
Number of characters to extract. streamsize is a signed integral type. Function returns the istream object (*this). Errors are signaled by modifying the internal state flags: • eofbit: The function stopped extracting characters because the input sequence has no more characters available (end-of-file reached). • failbit: Either the function could not extract n characters or the construction of sentry failed. • badbit: Error on stream (such as when this function catches an exception thrown by an internal operation). When set, the integrity of the stream may have been affected. Multiple flags may be set by a single operation. If the operation sets an internal state flag that was registered with member exceptions, the function throws an exception of member type failure.
Data races
Modifies the elements in the array pointed to by s and the stream object. Concurrent access to the same stream object may cause data races, except for the standard stream object cin when this is synchronized with stdio (in this case, no data races are initiated, although no guarantees are given on the order in which extracted characters are attributed to threads).
Exception safety
Basic guarantee: if an exception is thrown, the object is in a valid state. It throws an exception of member type failure if the resulting error state flag is not goodbit and member exceptions was set to throw for that state. Any exception thrown by an internal operation is caught and handled by the function, setting badbit. If badbit was set on the last call to exceptions, the function rethrows the caught exception.
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/* The function read() in <iostream> header file extracts n characters from the stream and stores them in the array pointed to the stream. Unlike functions put() and get() it is usually used to handle the data in binary form. */ /* extracts n characters from the stream and stores them in the array pointed by s with read() function code example. */ #include <iostream> #include <fstream> int main () { std::ifstream is ("test.txt", std::ifstream::binary); if (is) { is.seekg (0, is.end); int length = is.tellg(); is.seekg (0, is.beg); char * buffer = new char [length]; std::cout << "Reading " << length << " characters... "; is.read (buffer,length); if (is) std::cout << "all characters read successfully."; else std::cout << "error: only " << is.gcount() << " could be read"; is.close(); delete[] buffer; } return 0; }


"Array index" starts with 0, which means the first array element is at index 0, second is at index 1 and so on. We use this information to display the array elements. See the C++ code
A C++ program starts its execution from this method "main". Wherever this main method is, the main method will be executed first. '()' is used at the end as main is a method. Main
In C++ programming, you can create nested 'namespaces'. One namespace can be a part of another namespace. Simply we can create namespace X, which will contain namespace
In each iteration, Sorting is done in two Parts. At first, "set the highest" value to the highest index and decrement the index. Then Lowest Value to the Lowest Index and increment the