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C++ Programming Code Examples

C++ > Data Structures Code Examples

C++ Program to Implement Disjoint Set Data Structure

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/* C++ Program to Implement Disjoint Set Data Structure This C++ program implements the Disjoint Set data structure. It is a data structure that keeps track of a set of elements partitioned into a number of disjoint (nonoverlapping) subsets. */ #include <iostream> #include <cstdio> #include <vector> #include <algorithm> using namespace std; #define INF 1000000000 typedef pair<int ,int> ii; typedef vector <int> vi; vector <pair<int ,ii> > edges; vi pset; void init(int N) { pset.assign(N, 0); for(int i = 0; i < N; i++) { pset[i] = i; } } int find_set(int i) { if(pset[i] == i) { return pset[i]; } return pset[i] = find_set(pset[i]); } bool issameset (int i, int j) { return find_set(i) == find_set(j); } void joinset(int i, int j) { pset[find_set(i)] = find_set(j); } int main() { int n, m, a, b, dist, t; cin>>t; while(t--) { cin>>n>>m; init(n); edges.clear(); for (int i = 0; i < m; i++) { cin>>a>>b>>dist; a--,b--; ii tmp = make_pair(a, b); edges.push_back(make_pair(dist, tmp)); } sort(edges.rbegin(),edges.rend()); int sum = 0; for(int i = 0; i < edges.size(); i++) { if (!issameset (edges[i].second.first, edges[i].second.second)) { joinset(edges[i].second.first, edges[i].second.second); } else sum += edges[i].first; } cout<<sum; } cin>>t; getch(); }
For Loop Statement in C++
In computer programming, loops are used to repeat a block of code. For example, when you are displaying number from 1 to 100 you may want set the value of a variable to 1 and display it 100 times, increasing its value by 1 on each loop iteration. When you know exactly how many times you want to loop through a block of code, use the for loop instead of a while loop. A for loop is a repetition control structure that allows you to efficiently write a loop that needs to execute a specific number of times.
Syntax of For Loop Statement in C++
for (initialization; condition; update) { // body of-loop }
initialization
initializes variables and is executed only once.
condition
if true, the body of for loop is executed, if false, the for loop is terminated.
update
updates the value of initialized variables and again checks the condition. A new range-based for loop was introduced to work with collections such as arrays and vectors.
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/* For Loop Statement in C++ Language */ // C++ program to find the sum of first n natural numbers // positive integers such as 1,2,3,...n are known as natural numbers #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int num, sum; sum = 0; cout << "Enter a positive integer: "; cin >> num; for (int i = 1; i <= num; ++i) { sum += i; } cout << "Sum = " << sum << endl; return 0; }
Standard Input Stream (cin) in C++
The cin object is used to accept input from the standard input device i.e. keyboard. It is defined in the iostream header file. C++ cin statement is the instance of the class istream and is used to read input from the standard input device which is usually a keyboard. The extraction operator(>>) is used along with the object cin for reading inputs. The extraction operator extracts the data from the object cin which is entered using the keyboard.
Syntax for Standard Input Stream (cin) in C++
cin >> var_name;
>>
is the extraction operator.
var_name
is usually a variable, but can also be an element of containers like arrays, vectors, lists, etc. The "c" in cin refers to "character" and "in" means "input". Hence cin means "character input". The cin object is used along with the extraction operator >> in order to receive a stream of characters. The >> operator can also be used more than once in the same statement to accept multiple inputs. The cin object can also be used with other member functions such as getline(), read(), etc. Some of the commonly used member functions are: • cin.get(char &ch): Reads an input character and stores it in ch. • cin.getline(char *buffer, int length): Reads a stream of characters into the string buffer, It stops when: it has read length-1 characters or when it finds an end-of-line character '\n' or the end of the file eof. • cin.read(char *buffer, int n): Reads n bytes (or until the end of the file) from the stream into the buffer. • cin.ignore(int n): Ignores the next n characters from the input stream. • cin.eof(): Returns a non-zero value if the end of file (eof) is reached. The prototype of cin as defined in the iostream header file is: extern istream cin; The cin object in C++ is an object of class istream. It is associated with the standard C input stream stdin. The cin object is ensured to be initialized during or before the first time an object of type ios_base::Init is constructed. After the cin object is constructed, cin.tie() returns &cout. This means that any formatted input operation on cin forces a call to cout.flush() if any characters are pending for output.
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/* Standard Input Stream (cin) in C++ language */ // cin with Member Functions #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { char name[20], address[20]; cout << "Name: "; // use cin with getline() cin.getline(name, 20); cout << "Address: "; cin.getline(address, 20); cout << endl << "You entered " << endl; cout << "Name = " << name << endl; cout << "Address = " << address; return 0; }
Vector Library size() Function in C++
Return size. Returns the number of elements in the vector. This is the number of actual objects held in the vector, which is not necessarily equal to its storage capacity. vector::size() is a library function of "vector" header, it is used to get the size of a vector, it returns the total number of elements in the vector. The dynamic array can be created by using a vector in C++. One or more elements can be inserted into or removed from the vector at the run time that increases or decreases the size of the vector. The size or length of the vector can be counted using any loop or the built-in function named size().
Syntax for Vector size() Function in C++
#include <vector> size_type size() const noexcept;
This function does not accept any parameter. Function returns the number of elements in the container. Member type size_type is an unsigned integral type.
Complexity
Constant
Iterator validity
No changes
Data races
The container is accessed. No contained elements are accessed: concurrently accessing or modifying them is safe.
Exception safety
No-throw guarantee: this member function never throws exceptions.
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/* get the size of a vector, it returns the total number of elements in the vector by vector::size() library function. */ #include <bits/stdc++.h> using namespace std; int main() { // Initializing a vector of string type vector<string> vec = { "Happy", "8)", "Codings" }; // Clearing the vector // Now size is equal to 0 vec.clear(); // Typecasting vec.size() to int for (int i = 0; i < (int)vec.size() - 1; i++) cout << vec[i] << ' '; cout << "Happy8)Codings"; return 0; }
#include Directive in C++
#include is a way of including a standard or user-defined file in the program and is mostly written at the beginning of any C/C++ program. This directive is read by the preprocessor and orders it to insert the content of a user-defined or system header file into the following program. These files are mainly imported from an outside source into the current program. The process of importing such files that might be system-defined or user-defined is known as File Inclusion. This type of preprocessor directive tells the compiler to include a file in the source code program.
Syntax for #include Directive in C++
#include "user-defined_file"
Including using " ": When using the double quotes(" "), the preprocessor access the current directory in which the source "header_file" is located. This type is mainly used to access any header files of the user's program or user-defined files.
#include <header_file>
Including using <>: While importing file using angular brackets(<>), the the preprocessor uses a predetermined directory path to access the file. It is mainly used to access system header files located in the standard system directories. Header File or Standard files: This is a file which contains C/C++ function declarations and macro definitions to be shared between several source files. Functions like the printf(), scanf(), cout, cin and various other input-output or other standard functions are contained within different header files. So to utilise those functions, the users need to import a few header files which define the required functions. User-defined files: These files resembles the header files, except for the fact that they are written and defined by the user itself. This saves the user from writing a particular function multiple times. Once a user-defined file is written, it can be imported anywhere in the program using the #include preprocessor. • In #include directive, comments are not recognized. So in case of #include <a//b>, a//b is treated as filename. • In #include directive, backslash is considered as normal text not escape sequence. So in case of #include <a\nb>, a\nb is treated as filename. • You can use only comment after filename otherwise it will give error.
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/* using #include directive in C language */ #include <stdio.h> int main() { /* * C standard library printf function * defined in the stdio.h header file */ printf("I love you Clementine"); printf("I love you so much"); printf("HappyCodings"); return 0; }
Vector Library push_back() Function in C++
Add element at the end. Adds a new element at the end of the vector, after its current last element. The content of val is copied (or moved) to the new element. This effectively increases the container size by one, which causes an automatic reallocation of the allocated storage space if -and only if- the new vector size surpasses the current vector capacity. push_back() function is used to push elements into a vector from the back. The new value is inserted into the vector at the end, after the current last element and the container size is increased by 1.
Syntax for Vector push_back() Function in C++
#include <vector> void push_back (const value_type& val); void push_back (value_type&& val);
val
Value to be copied (or moved) to the new element. Member type value_type is the type of the elements in the container, defined in vector as an alias of its first template parameter (T). This function does not return any value. If a reallocation happens, the storage is allocated using the container's allocator, which may throw exceptions on failure (for the default allocator, bad_alloc is thrown if the allocation request does not succeed).
Complexity
Constant (amortized time, reallocation may happen). If a reallocation happens, the reallocation is itself up to linear in the entire size.
Iterator validity
If a reallocation happens, all iterators, pointers and references related to the container are invalidated. Otherwise, only the end iterator is invalidated, and all iterators, pointers and references to elements are guaranteed to keep referring to the same elements they were referring to before the call.
Data races
The container is modified. If a reallocation happens, all contained elements are modified. Otherwise, no existing element is accessed, and concurrently accessing or modifying them is safe.
Exception safety
If no reallocations happen, there are no changes in the container in case of exception (strong guarantee). If a reallocation happens, the strong guarantee is also given if the type of the elements is either copyable or no-throw moveable. Otherwise, the container is guaranteed to end in a valid state (basic guarantee). If allocator_traits::construct is not supported with val as argument, it causes undefined behavior.
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/* vector::push_back() is a library function of "vector" header, it is used to insert/add an element at the end of the vector, it accepts an element of the same type and adds the given element at the end of the vector and increases the size of the vector. */ //C++ STL program code example to demonstrate example of vector::push_back() function #include <iostream> #include <vector> using namespace std; int main() { //vector declaration vector<int> v1; //inserting elements and printing size cout << "size of v1: " << v1.size() << endl; v1.push_back(10); cout << "size of v1: " << v1.size() << endl; v1.push_back(20); v1.push_back(30); v1.push_back(40); v1.push_back(50); cout << "size of v1: " << v1.size() << endl; //printing all elements cout << "elements of vector v1..." << endl; for (int x : v1) cout << x << " "; cout << endl; return 0; }
While Loop Statement in C++
In while loop, condition is evaluated first and if it returns true then the statements inside while loop execute, this happens repeatedly until the condition returns false. When condition returns false, the control comes out of loop and jumps to the next statement in the program after while loop. The important point to note when using while loop is that we need to use increment or decrement statement inside while loop so that the loop variable gets changed on each iteration, and at some point condition returns false. This way we can end the execution of while loop otherwise the loop would execute indefinitely. A while loop that never stops is said to be the infinite while loop, when we give the condition in such a way so that it never returns false, then the loops becomes infinite and repeats itself indefinitely.
Syntax for While Loop Statement in C++
while (condition) { // body of the loop }
• A while loop evaluates the condition • If the condition evaluates to true, the code inside the while loop is executed. • The condition is evaluated again. • This process continues until the condition is false. • When the condition evaluates to false, the loop terminates. Do not forget to increase the variable used in the condition, otherwise the loop will never end!
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/* While Loop Statement in C++ language */ // program to find the sum of positive numbers // if the user enters a negative number, the loop ends // the negative number entered is not added to the sum #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int number; int sum = 0; // take input from the user cout << "Enter a number: "; cin >> number; while (number >= 0) { // add all positive numbers sum += number; // take input again if the number is positive cout << "Enter a number: "; cin >> number; } // display the sum cout << "\nThe sum is " << sum << endl; return 0; }
Utility Library make_pair() Function in C++
Construct pair object. Constructs a pair object with its first element set to x and its second element set to y. The template types can be implicitly deduced from the arguments passed to make_pair. pair objects can be constructed from other pair objects containing different types, if the respective types are implicitly convertible.
Syntax for Utility make_pair() Function in C++
#include <utility> template <class T1, class T2> pair<V1,V2> make_pair (T1&& x, T2&& y); // see below for definition of V1 and V2
x, y
Values for the members first and second, respectively, of the pair object being constructed. Function returns a pair object whose elements first and second are set to x and y respectivelly. The template parameters can be implicitly deduced.
pair<V1,V2>(std::forward<T1>(x),std::forward<T2>(y))
Where the types V1 and V2 are the decay equivalents of T1 and T2, respectively (except for reference_wrapper types, for which the corresponding reference type is used instead). If T1 and/or T2 are rvalue references, the objects are moved and x and/or y are left in an undefined but valid state.
Data races
If either (or both) T1 or T2 is an rvalue reference type of a type supporting move semantics, its corresponding argument is modified.
Exception safety
The function provides the same level of guarantees to each object as provided by the corresponding element constructor.
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/* make_pair() function constructs a pair object with its first element set to x and its second element set to y. */ /* Construct pair object by std::make_pair function code example */ #include <iostream> #include <utility> #include <functional> int main() { int n = 1; int a[5] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}; // build a pair from two ints auto p1 = std::make_pair(n, a[1]); std::cout << "The value of p1 is " << "(" << p1.first << ", " << p1.second << ")\n"; // build a pair from a reference to int and an array (decayed to pointer) auto p2 = std::make_pair(std::ref(n), a); n = 7; std::cout << "The value of p2 is " << "(" << p2.first << ", " << *(p2.second + 2) << ")\n"; }
Assignment Operators in C++
As the name already suggests, these operators help in assigning values to variables. These operators help us in allocating a particular value to the operands. The main simple assignment operator is '='. We have to be sure that both the left and right sides of the operator must have the same data type. We have different levels of operators. Assignment operators are used to assign the value, variable and function to another variable. Assignment operators in C are some of the C Programming Operator, which are useful to assign the values to the declared variables. Let's discuss the various types of the assignment operators such as =, +=, -=, /=, *= and %=. The following table lists the assignment operators supported by the C language:
=
Simple assignment operator. Assigns values from right side operands to left side operand
+=
Add AND assignment operator. It adds the right operand to the left operand and assign the result to the left operand.
-=
Subtract AND assignment operator. It subtracts the right operand from the left operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
*=
Multiply AND assignment operator. It multiplies the right operand with the left operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
/=
Divide AND assignment operator. It divides the left operand with the right operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
%=
Modulus AND assignment operator. It takes modulus using two operands and assigns the result to the left operand.
<<=
Left shift AND assignment operator.
>>=
Right shift AND assignment operator.
&=
Bitwise AND assignment operator.
^=
Bitwise exclusive OR and assignment operator.
|=
Bitwise inclusive OR and assignment operator.
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/* Assignment operators are used to assigning value to a variable. The left side operand of the assignment operator is a variable and right side operand of the assignment operator is a value. The value on the right side must be of the same data-type of the variable on the left side otherwise the compiler will raise an error. */ // C++ program to demonstrate working of Assignment operators #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { // Assigning value 10 to a // using "=" operator int a = 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by adding 10 to a // using "+=" operator a += 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by subtracting 10 from a // using "-=" operator a -= 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by multiplying 10 to a // using "*=" operator a *= 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; // Assigning value by dividing 10 from a // using "/=" operator a /= 10; cout << "Value of a is "<<a<<"\n"; return 0; }
Vectors in C++ Language
In C++, vectors are used to store elements of similar data types. However, unlike arrays, the size of a vector can grow dynamically. That is, we can change the size of the vector during the execution of a program as per our requirements. Vectors are part of the C++ Standard Template Library. To use vectors, we need to include the vector header file in our program.
Declaration for Vectors in C++
std::vector<T> vector_name;
The type parameter <T> specifies the type of the vector. It can be any primitive data type such as int, char, float, etc.
Initialization for Vectors in C++
// Vector initialization method 1 // Initializer list vector<int> vector1 = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
We are initializing the vector by providing values directly to the vector. vector1 is initialized with values 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.
// Vector initialization method 2 vector<int> vector3(5, 12);
Here, 5 is the size of the vector and 8 is the value. This code creates an int vector with size 5 and initializes the vector with the value of 8. So, the vector is equivalent to
vector<int> vector2 = {8, 8, 8, 8, 8};
The vector class provides various methods to perform different operations on vectors. Add Elements to a Vector: To add a single element into a vector, we use the push_back() function. It inserts an element into the end of the vector. Access Elements of a Vector: In C++, we use the index number to access the vector elements. Here, we use the at() function to access the element from the specified index. Change Vector Element: We can change an element of the vector using the same at() function. Delete Elements from C++ Vectors: To delete a single element from a vector, we use the pop_back() function. In C++, the vector header file provides various functions that can be used to perform different operations on a vector. • size(): returns the number of elements present in the vector. • clear(): removes all the elements of the vector. • front(): returns the first element of the vector. • back(): returns the last element of the vector. • empty(): returns 1 (true) if the vector is empty. • capacity(): check the overall size of a vector. Vector iterators are used to point to the memory address of a vector element. In some ways, they act like pointers.
Syntax for Vector Iterators in C++
vector<T>::iterator iteratorName;
We can initialize vector iterators using the begin() and end() functions. The begin() function returns an iterator that points to the first element of the vector. The end() function points to the theoretical element that comes after the final element of the vector.
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/* Vectors in C++ language */ // C++ program to illustrate the capacity function in vector #include <iostream> #include <vector> using namespace std; int main() { vector<int> myvector; for (int i = 1; i <= 5; i++) myvector.push_back(i); cout << "Size : " << myvector.size(); cout << "\nCapacity : " << myvector.capacity(); cout << "\nMax_Size : " << myvector.max_size(); // resizes the vector size to 4 myvector.resize(4); // prints the vector size after resize() cout << "\nSize : " << myvector.size(); // checks if the vector is empty or not if (myvector.empty() == false) cout << "\nVector is not empty"; else cout << "\nVector is empty"; // Shrinks the vector myvector.shrink_to_fit(); cout << "\nVector elements are: "; for (auto it = myvector.begin(); it != myvector.end(); it++) cout << *it << " "; return 0; }
Vector Library clear() Function in C++
The C++ vector has many member functions. Two of them are clear() and erase(). clear() "removes" all the elements of the vector. erase() "removes" a single element or a range of elements. vector::clear() is a library function of "vector" header, it is used to remove/clear all elements of the vector, it makes the 0 sized vector after removing all elements. The C++ vector::clear function is used to clear all elements of the vector. This function makes the vector empty with a size of zero.
Syntax for Vector clear() Function in C++
#include <vector> void clear() noexcept;
The function does not accept any parameter. The function does not return any type. Erases all elements from the container. To use vector, include <vector> header.
Complexity
Linear in size (destructions). This may be optimized to constant complexity for trivially-destructible types (such as scalar or PODs), where elements need not be destroyed.
Iterator validity
All iterators, pointers and references related to this container are invalidated.
Data races
The container is modified. All contained elements are modified.
Exception safety
No-throw guarantee: this member function never throws exceptions.
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/* clear all elements of the vector by vector::clear function code example */ #include <iostream> #include <vector> using namespace std; int main (){ vector<int> MyVector{10, 20, 30, 40, 50}; vector<int>::iterator it; cout<<"Before clear() function: \nMyVector contains:"; for(it = MyVector.begin(); it != MyVector.end(); ++it) cout<<" "<<*it; cout<<"\nMyVector size is: "<<MyVector.size()<<"\n\n"; MyVector.clear(); cout<<"After clear() function: \nMyVector contains:"; for(it = MyVector.begin(); it != MyVector.end(); ++it) cout<<" "<<*it; cout<<"\nMyVector size is: "<<MyVector.size(); return 0; }
Vector Library Operator Index [] in C++
Access element. Returns a reference to the element at position n in the vector container. A similar member function, vector::at, has the same behavior as this operator function, except that vector::at is bound-checked and signals if the requested position is out of range by throwing an out_of_range exception. Portable programs should never call this function with an argument n that is out of range, since this causes undefined behavior.
Syntax for Vector Operator Index [] in C++
#include <vector> reference operator[] (size_type n); const_reference operator[] (size_type n) const;
n
Position of an element in the container. Notice that the first element has a position of 0 (not 1). Member type size_type is an unsigned integral type. Function returns the element at the specified position in the vector. If the vector object is const-qualified, the function returns a const_reference. Otherwise, it returns a reference. Member types reference and const_reference are the reference types to the elements of the container (see vector member types).
Complexity
Constant
Iterator validity
No changes
Data races
The container is accessed (neither the const nor the non-const versions modify the container). The reference returned can be used to access or modify elements. Concurrently accessing or modifying different elements is safe.
Exception safety
If the container size is greater than n, the function never throws exceptions (no-throw guarantee). Otherwise, the behavior is undefined.
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/* Returns a reference to the element at specified location pos. No bounds checking is performed. Unlike std::map::operator[], this operator never inserts a new element into the container. Accessing a nonexistent element through this operator is undefined behavior. */ /* Access element from a vector by vector::operator[] code example */ #include <iostream> #include <vector> int main () { std::vector<int> myvector (10); // 10 zero-initialized elements std::vector<int>::size_type sz = myvector.size(); // assign some values: for (unsigned i=0; i<sz; i++) myvector[i]=i; // reverse vector using operator[]: for (unsigned i=0; i<sz/2; i++) { int temp; temp = myvector[sz-1-i]; myvector[sz-1-i]=myvector[i]; myvector[i]=temp; } std::cout << "myvector contains:"; for (unsigned i=0; i<sz; i++) std::cout << ' ' << myvector[i]; std::cout << '\n'; return 0; }
getch() Function in C++
The getch() is a predefined non-standard function that is defined in conio.h header file. It is mostly used by the Dev C/C++, MS- DOS's compilers like Turbo C to hold the screen until the user passes a single value to exit from the console screen. It can also be used to read a single byte character or string from the keyboard and then print. It does not hold any parameters. It has no buffer area to store the input character in a program.
Syntax for getch() Function in C++
#include <conio.h> int getch(void);
The getch() function does not accept any parameter from the user. It returns the ASCII value of the key pressed by the user as an input. We use a getch() function in a C/ C++ program to hold the output screen for some time until the user passes a key from the keyboard to exit the console screen. Using getch() function, we can hide the input character provided by the users in the ATM PIN, password, etc. • getch() method pauses the Output Console until a key is pressed. • It does not use any buffer to store the input character. • The entered character is immediately returned without waiting for the enter key. • The entered character does not show up on the console. • The getch() method can be used to accept hidden inputs like password, ATM pin numbers, etc.
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/* wait for any character input from keyboard by getch() function code example. The getch() function is very useful if you want to read a character input from the keyboard. */ // C code to illustrate working of // getch() to accept hidden inputs #include<iostream.h> #include<conio.h> void main() { int a=10, b=20; int sum=0; clrscr(); sum=a+b; cout<<"Sum: "<<sum; getch(); // use getch() befor end of main() }
Vector Library assign() Function in C++
Assign vector content. Assigns new contents to the vector, replacing its current contents, and modifying its size accordingly. The C++ function std::vector::assign() assign new values to the vector elements by replacing old ones. It modifies size of vector if necessary. If memory allocation happens allocation is allocated by internal allocator.
Syntax for Vector assign() Function in C++
#include <vector> //range (1) template <class InputIterator> void assign (InputIterator first, InputIterator last); //fill (2) void assign (size_type n, const value_type& val); //initializer list (3) void assign (initializer_list<value_type> il);
first, last
Input iterators to the initial and final positions in a sequence. The range used is [first,last), which includes all the elements between first and last, including the element pointed by first but not the element pointed by last. The function template argument InputIterator shall be an input iterator type that points to elements of a type from which value_type objects can be constructed.
n
New size for the container. Member type size_type is an unsigned integral type.
val
Value to fill the container with. Each of the n elements in the container will be initialized to a copy of this value. Member type value_type is the type of the elements in the container, defined in vector as an alias of its first template parameter (T).
il
An initializer_list object. The compiler will automatically construct such objects from initializer list declarators. Member type value_type is the type of the elements in the container, defined in vector as an alias of its first template parameter (T). This function does not return any value. In the range version (1), the new contents are elements constructed from each of the elements in the range between first and last, in the same order. In the fill version (2), the new contents are n elements, each initialized to a copy of val. In the initializer list version (3), the new contents are copies of the values passed as initializer list, in the same order. The internal allocator is used (through its traits) to allocate and deallocate storage if a reallocation happens. It is also used to destroy all existing elements, and to construct the new ones. Any elements held in the container before the call are destroyed and replaced by newly constructed elements (no assignments of elements take place). This causes an automatic reallocation of the allocated storage space if -and only if- the new vector size surpasses the current vector capacity.
Complexity
Linear on initial and final sizes (destructions, constructions). Additionally, in the range version (1), if InputIterator is not at least of a forward iterator category (i.e., it is just an input iterator) the new capacity cannot be determined beforehand and the operation incurs in additional logarithmic complexity in the new size (reallocations while growing).
Iterator validity
All iterators, pointers and references related to this container are invalidated.
Data races
All copied elements are accessed. The container is modified. All contained elements are modified.
Exception safety
Basic guarantee: if an exception is thrown, the container is in a valid state. If allocator_traits::construct is not supported with the appropriate arguments for the element constructions, or if the range specified by [first,last) is not valid, it causes undefined behavior.
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/* vector::assign() is a library function of "vector" header, it is used to initialize a vector or assign content to a vector, it assigns the new content to the vector, update the existing content, and also resizes the vector's size according to the content. */ /* assign new values to the vector and replacing the old ones by vector assign() function code example. */ #include <iostream> #include <vector> using namespace std; int main() { //declaring vectors vector<int> v1; vector<int> v2; vector<int> v3; //an array that will be used to assign a vector int arr[] = { 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 }; //assigning vectors //assigning v1 with 5 elements and 100 as default value v1.assign(5, 100); //assigning v1 with array v2.assign(arr + 0, arr + 5); //assigning v3 with vector v2 v3.assign(v2.begin(), v2.end()); //pritning the vectors cout << "v1: "; for (int x : v1) cout << x << " "; cout << endl; cout << "v2: "; for (int x : v2) cout << x << " "; cout << endl; cout << "v3: "; for (int x : v3) cout << x << " "; cout << endl; return 0; }
Algorithm Library sort() Function in C++
Sort elements in range. Sorts the elements in the range [first,last) into ascending order. The elements are compared using operator< for the first version, and comp for the second. Equivalent elements are not guaranteed to keep their original relative order (see stable_sort). C++ Algorithm sort() function is used to sort the elements in the range [first, last) into ascending order. The elements are compared using operator < for the first version, and comp for the second version. std::sort() is a built-in function in C++'s Standard Template Library. The function takes in a beginning iterator, an ending iterator, and (by default) sorts the iterable in ascending order. The function can also be used for custom sorting by passing in a comparator function that returns a boolean.
Syntax for sort() Function in C++
#include <algorithm> default (1) template <class RandomAccessIterator> void sort (RandomAccessIterator first, RandomAccessIterator last); custom (2) template <class RandomAccessIterator, class Compare> void sort (RandomAccessIterator first, RandomAccessIterator last, Compare comp);
first, last
Random-access iterators to the initial and final positions of the sequence to be sorted. The range used is [first,last), which contains all the elements between first and last, including the element pointed by first but not the element pointed by last. RandomAccessIterator shall point to a type for which swap is properly defined and which is both move-constructible and move-assignable.
comp
Binary function that accepts two elements in the range as arguments, and returns a value convertible to bool. The value returned indicates whether the element passed as first argument is considered to go before the second in the specific strict weak ordering it defines. The function shall not modify any of its arguments. This can either be a function pointer or a function object. This function does not return any value.
Complexity
On average, linearithmic in the distance between first and last: Performs approximately N*log2(N) (where N is this distance) comparisons of elements, and up to that many element swaps (or moves).
Data races
The objects in the range [first,last) are modified.
Exceptions
Throws if any of the element comparisons, the element swaps (or moves) or the operations on iterators throws. Note that invalid arguments cause undefined behavior.
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/* sort a number of elements or a list of elements within first to last elements, in an ascending or a descending order by sort() function code example */ #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <algorithm> #include <functional> using namespace std; void print(const vector <std::string>& v) { vector <string>::const_iterator i; for(i = v.begin(); i != v.end(); i++) { cout << *i << " "; } cout << endl; } int main() { vector <string> v; // Push functional programming languages v.push_back("Lisp"); v.push_back("C#"); v.push_back("Java"); v.push_back("Python"); v.push_back("C++"); v.push_back("Pascal"); v.push_back("Sql"); // sort without predicate sort(v.begin(), v.end()); cout << "Sorted list of functional programming languages - " << endl; print(v); // sort with predicate sort(v.begin(), v.end(), std::greater<std::string>()); cout << "Reverse Sorted list of functional programming languages - " << endl; print(v); }
Pairs in C++ Language
In C++, pair is defined as a container in a header library <utility> which combines the two data elements having either the same data types or different data types. In general, the pair in C++ is defined as a tuple in Python programming language which also can give the output as a combined result of joining the two items specified by the pair container and it consists of the first element will be first and the second element will be second only it cannot be disturbed in the order or sequence of elements specified and are always accessed by the dot operator followed by the keyword "first" and "second" elements respectively. In C++ the pair is a container in <utility> header and is also a container class in STL (Standard Template Library) which uses "std" namespace so it will be as std::pair template class for demonstrating pair as a tuple.
Declaring a Pair in C++
#include <utility> pair(dt1, dt2) pairname;
dt1
datatype for the first element.
dt2
datatype for the second element.
pairname
a name which is used to refer to the pair objects .first and .second elements.
Initializing a Pair
pair (data_type1, data_type2) Pair_name (value1, value2) ;
Different ways to initialize pair:
pair g1; //default pair g2(1, 'a'); //initialized, different data type pair g3(1, 10); //initialized, same data type pair g4(g3); //copy of g3
In C++, pair container behaves like a tuple in Python programming language but a tuple can have a list of items whereas pair can have only two items or elements which can be of different data types or the same datatype as in tuple. The declaration of pair in C++ is done using the keyword "pair" and is a container that is provided from <utility> library. So basically, pair is used for joining two elements or values into one which also allows storing items of different data types or two heterogeneous objects into one single unit. The pair container can store only two elements first element in "first" and can be referenced by "first" only and the second element can be only in "second". We can use operators such as =, !=, = =, >=, <= with pair and also we can swap the one content of one pair with other pair also using the swap() function and there is also a feature where we can create a value pair without declaring the datatypes explicitly using make_pair() function where we need not specify the datatype and write the values directly. • The assignment (=) operator lets us assign the values of one pair to another. • The equality (==) operator returns true if two pairs contain the same values. The inequality (!=) operator returns true if two pairs do not contain the same values. • The less-than (<) and greater-than (>) operators work by only comparing the first values of the pairs being compared. The same can be said about the <= and >= operators.
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/* working of pair in C++ language code examples */ #include <iostream> #include<utility> using namespace std; int main() { pair<int, int>pair1 = make_pair(90, 100); pair<int, int>pair2 = make_pair(4, 30); cout<< "Use of operators with pair and it results in true (1) or false (0)"; cout << (pair1 <= pair2) << endl; cout << (pair1 >= pair2) << endl; cout << (pair1 > pair2) << endl; cout << (pair1 < pair2) << endl; cout << (pair1 == pair2) << endl; cout << (pair1 != pair2) << endl; cout << "Use of swap function with pair"; cout << "Before swapping:\n" ; cout << "Contents of pair1 = " << pair1.first << " " << pair1.second << "\n"; cout << "Contents of pair2 = " << pair2.first << " " << pair2.second << "\n"; pair1.swap(pair2); cout << "\nAfter swapping:\n"; cout << "Contents of pair1 = " << pair1.first << " " << pair1.second << "\n " ; cout << "Contents of pair2 = " << pair2.first << " " << pair2.second << "\n" ; return 0; }
Vector Library rend() Function in C++
Return reverse iterator to reverse end. Returns a reverse iterator pointing to the theoretical element preceding the first element in the vector (which is considered its reverse end). The C++ vector::rend function returns the reverse iterator pointing to the element preceding the first element (reversed past-the-last element) of the vector. A reverse iterator iterates in backward direction and increasing it results into moving to the beginning of the vector container. Similarly, decreasing a reverse iterator results into moving to the end of the vector container. The range between vector::rbegin and vector::rend contains all the elements of the vector (in reverse order).
Syntax for Vector rend() Function in C++
#include <vector> reverse_iterator rend() noexcept; const_reverse_iterator rend() const noexcept;
This function does not accept any parameter. Function returns a reverse iterator to the reverse end of the sequence container. If the vector object is const-qualified, the function returns a const_reverse_iterator. Otherwise, it returns a reverse_iterator. Member types reverse_iterator and const_reverse_iterator are reverse random access iterator types (pointing to an element and to a const element, respectively).
Complexity
Constant
Iterator validity
No changes
Data races
The container is accessed (neither the const nor the non-const versions modify the container). No contained elements are accessed by the call, but the iterator returned can be used to access or modify elements. Concurrently accessing or modifying different elements is safe.
Exception safety
No-throw guarantee: this member function never throws exceptions. The copy construction or assignment of the returned iterator is also guaranteed to never throw.
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/* vector::rend() is a library function of "vector" header, it is used to get the first element of a vector using reverse_iterator, it returns a reverse iterator pointing to the element preceding the first element (i.e. reverse ending) of a vector. */ /* Return reverse iterator to reverse end by vector rend() function code example */ #include <bits/stdc++.h> using namespace std; int main() { vector<int> v; v.push_back(11); v.push_back(12); v.push_back(13); v.push_back(14); v.push_back(15); cout << "The last element is: " << *v.rbegin(); // prints all the elements cout << "\nThe vector elements in reverse order are:\n"; for (auto it = v.rbegin(); it != v.rend(); it++) cout << *it << " "; return 0; }
Vector Library rbegin() Function in C++
Return reverse iterator to reverse beginning. Returns a reverse iterator pointing to the last element in the vector (i.e., its reverse beginning). vector::rbegin() is a built-in function in C++ STL which returns a reverse iterator pointing to the last element in the container. Reverse iterators iterate backwards: increasing them moves them towards the beginning of the container. rbegin points to the element right before the one that would be pointed to by member end. Notice that unlike member vector::back, which returns a reference to this same element, this function returns a reverse random access iterator.
Syntax for Vector rbegin() Function in C++
#include <vector> reverse_iterator rbegin() noexcept; const_reverse_iterator rbegin() const noexcept;
This function does not accept any parameter. Function returns a reverse iterator to the reverse beginning of the sequence container. If the vector object is const-qualified, the function returns a const_reverse_iterator. Otherwise, it returns a reverse_iterator. Member types reverse_iterator and const_reverse_iterator are reverse random access iterator types (pointing to an element and to a const element, respectively). See vector member types.
Complexity
Constant
Iterator validity
No changes
Data races
The container is accessed (neither the const nor the non-const versions modify the container). No contained elements are accessed by the call, but the iterator returned can be used to access or modify elements. Concurrently accessing or modifying different elements is safe.
Exception safety
No-throw guarantee: this member function never throws exceptions. The copy construction or assignment of the returned iterator is also guaranteed to never throw.
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/* The C++ function std::vector::rbegin() returns a reverse iterator which points to the last element of the vector. */ /* Return the reverse iterator pointing to the last element of the vector by vector::rbegin function code example. */ #include <bits/stdc++.h> using namespace std; int main() { vector<int> v; v.push_back(11); v.push_back(12); v.push_back(13); v.push_back(14); v.push_back(15); // prints all the elements cout << "The vector elements in reverse order are:\n"; for (auto it = v.rbegin(); it != v.rend(); it++) cout << *it << " "; return 0; }
Standard Output Stream (cout) in C++
The cout is a predefined object of ostream class. It is connected with the standard output device, which is usually a display screen. The cout is used in conjunction with stream insertion operator (<<) to display the output on a console. On most program environments, the standard output by default is the screen, and the C++ stream object defined to access it is cout.
Syntax for cout in C++
cout << var_name; //or cout << "Some String";
The syntax of the cout object in C++: cout << var_name; Or cout << "Some String";
<<
is the insertion operator
var_name
is usually a variable, but can also be an array element or elements of containers like vectors, lists, maps, etc. The "c" in cout refers to "character" and "out" means "output". Hence cout means "character output". The cout object is used along with the insertion operator << in order to display a stream of characters. The << operator can be used more than once with a combination of variables, strings, and manipulators. cout is used for displaying data on the screen. The operator << called as insertion operator or put to operator. The Insertion operator can be overloaded. Insertion operator is similar to the printf() operation in C. cout is the object of ostream class. Data flow direction is from variable to output device. Multiple outputs can be displayed using cout.
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/* standard output stream (cout) in C++ language */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { string str = "Do not interrupt me"; char ch = 'm'; // use cout with write() cout.write(str,6); cout << endl; // use cout with put() cout.put(ch); return 0; }
If Else Statement in C++
In computer programming, we use the if statement to run a block code only when a certain condition is met. An if statement can be followed by an optional else statement, which executes when the boolean expression is false. There are three forms of if...else statements in C++: • if statement, • if...else statement, • if...else if...else statement,
Syntax for If Statement in C++
if (condition) { // body of if statement }
The if statement evaluates the condition inside the parentheses ( ). If the condition evaluates to true, the code inside the body of if is executed. If the condition evaluates to false, the code inside the body of if is skipped.
Syntax for If...Else Statement
if (condition) { // block of code if condition is true } else { // block of code if condition is false }
The if..else statement evaluates the condition inside the parenthesis. If the condition evaluates true, the code inside the body of if is executed, the code inside the body of else is skipped from execution. If the condition evaluates false, the code inside the body of else is executed, the code inside the body of if is skipped from execution. The if...else statement is used to execute a block of code among two alternatives. However, if we need to make a choice between more than two alternatives, we use the if...else if...else statement.
Syntax for If...Else...Else If Statement in C++
if (condition1) { // code block 1 } else if (condition2){ // code block 2 } else { // code block 3 }
• If condition1 evaluates to true, the code block 1 is executed. • If condition1 evaluates to false, then condition2 is evaluated. • If condition2 is true, the code block 2 is executed. • If condition2 is false, the code block 3 is executed. There can be more than one else if statement but only one if and else statements. In C/C++ if-else-if ladder helps user decide from among multiple options. The C/C++ if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the C else-if ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
Syntax for If Else If Ladder in C++
if (condition) statement 1; else if (condition) statement 2; . . else statement;
Working of the if-else-if ladder: 1. Control falls into the if block. 2. The flow jumps to Condition 1. 3. Condition is tested. If Condition yields true, goto Step 4. If Condition yields false, goto Step 5. 4. The present block is executed. Goto Step 7. 5. The flow jumps to Condition 2. If Condition yields true, goto step 4. If Condition yields false, goto Step 6. 6. The flow jumps to Condition 3. If Condition yields true, goto step 4. If Condition yields false, execute else block. Goto Step 7. 7. Exits the if-else-if ladder. • The if else ladder statement in C++ programming language is used to check set of conditions in sequence. • This is useful when we want to selectively executes one code block(out of many) based on certain conditions. • It allows us to check for multiple condition expressions and execute different code blocks for more than two conditions. • A condition expression is tested only when all previous if conditions in if-else ladder is false. • If any of the conditional expression evaluates to true, then it will execute the corresponding code block and exits whole if-else ladder.
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/* If Else Statement in C++ Language */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main () { // local variable declaration: int a = 100; // check the boolean condition if( a < 20 ) { // if condition is true then print the following cout << "a is less than 20;" << endl; } else { // if condition is false then print the following cout << "a is not less than 20;" << endl; } cout << "value of a is : " << a << endl; return 0; }
main() Function in C++
A program shall contain a global function named main, which is the designated start of the program in hosted environment. main() function is the entry point of any C++ program. It is the point at which execution of program is started. When a C++ program is executed, the execution control goes directly to the main() function. Every C++ program have a main() function.
Syntax for main() Function in C++
void main() { ............ ............ }
void
void is a keyword in C++ language, void means nothing, whenever we use void as a function return type then that function nothing return. here main() function no return any value.
main
main is a name of function which is predefined function in C++ library. In place of void we can also use int return type of main() function, at that time main() return integer type value. 1) It cannot be used anywhere in the program a) in particular, it cannot be called recursively b) its address cannot be taken 2) It cannot be predefined and cannot be overloaded: effectively, the name main in the global namespace is reserved for functions (although it can be used to name classes, namespaces, enumerations, and any entity in a non-global namespace, except that a function called "main" cannot be declared with C language linkage in any namespace). 3) It cannot be defined as deleted or (since C++11) declared with C language linkage, constexpr (since C++11), consteval (since C++20), inline, or static. 4) The body of the main function does not need to contain the return statement: if control reaches the end of main without encountering a return statement, the effect is that of executing return 0;. 5) Execution of the return (or the implicit return upon reaching the end of main) is equivalent to first leaving the function normally (which destroys the objects with automatic storage duration) and then calling std::exit with the same argument as the argument of the return. (std::exit then destroys static objects and terminates the program). 6) (since C++14) The return type of the main function cannot be deduced (auto main() {... is not allowed). 7) (since C++20) The main function cannot be a coroutine.
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/* simple code example by main() function in C++ */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int day = 4; switch (day) { case 1: cout << "Monday"; break; case 2: cout << "Tuesday"; break; case 3: cout << "Wednesday"; break; case 4: cout << "Thursday"; break; case 5: cout << "Friday"; break; case 6: cout << "Saturday"; break; case 7: cout << "Sunday"; break; } return 0; }
Namespaces in C++ Language
Consider a situation, when we have two persons with the same name, jhon, in the same class. Whenever we need to differentiate them definitely we would have to use some additional information along with their name, like either the area, if they live in different area or their mother's or father's name, etc. Same situation can arise in your C++ applications. For example, you might be writing some code that has a function called xyz() and there is another library available which is also having same function xyz(). Now the compiler has no way of knowing which version of xyz() function you are referring to within your code. A namespace is designed to overcome this difficulty and is used as additional information to differentiate similar functions, classes, variables etc. with the same name available in different libraries. Using namespace, you can define the context in which names are defined. In essence, a namespace defines a scope.
Defining a Namespace
A namespace definition begins with the keyword namespace followed by the namespace name as follows:
namespace namespace_name { // code declarations }
To call the namespace-enabled version of either function or variable, prepend (::) the namespace name as follows:
name::code; // code could be variable or function.
Using Directive
You can also avoid prepending of namespaces with the using namespace directive. This directive tells the compiler that the subsequent code is making use of names in the specified namespace.
Discontiguous Namespaces
A namespace can be defined in several parts and so a namespace is made up of the sum of its separately defined parts. The separate parts of a namespace can be spread over multiple files. So, if one part of the namespace requires a name defined in another file, that name must still be declared. Writing a following namespace definition either defines a new namespace or adds new elements to an existing one:
namespace namespace_name { // code declarations }
Nested Namespaces
Namespaces can be nested where you can define one namespace inside another name space as follows:
namespace namespace_name1 { // code declarations namespace namespace_name2 { // code declarations } }
• Namespace is a feature added in C++ and not present in C. • A namespace is a declarative region that provides a scope to the identifiers (names of the types, function, variables etc) inside it. • Multiple namespace blocks with the same name are allowed. All declarations within those blocks are declared in the named scope. • Namespace declarations appear only at global scope. • Namespace declarations can be nested within another namespace. • Namespace declarations don't have access specifiers. (Public or private) • No need to give semicolon after the closing brace of definition of namespace. • We can split the definition of namespace over several units.
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/* namespaces in C++ language */ // A C++ code to demonstrate that we can define // methods outside namespace. #include <iostream> using namespace std; // Creating a namespace namespace ns { void display(); class happy { public: void display(); }; } // Defining methods of namespace void ns::happy::display() { cout << "ns::happy::display()\n"; } void ns::display() { cout << "ns::display()\n"; } // Driver code int main() { ns::happy obj; ns::display(); obj.display(); return 0; }
#define Directive in C++
In the C++ Programming Language, the #define directive allows the definition of macros within your source code. These macro definitions allow constant values to be declared for use throughout your code. Macro definitions are not variables and cannot be changed by your program code like variables. You generally use this syntax when creating constants that represent numbers, strings or expressions. The syntax for creating a constant using #define in the C++ is: #define token value
Syntax for #define Directive in C++
#define macro-name replacement-text
• Using #define to create Macros Macros also follow the same structure as Symbolic Constants; however, Macros allow arguments to be included in the identifier:
#define SQUARE_AREA(l) ((l) * (l))
Unlike in functions, the argument here is enclosed in parenthesis in the identifier and does not have a type associated with it. Before compilation, the compiler will replace every instance of SQUARE_AREA(l) by ((l) * (l)), where l can be any expression. • Conditional Compilation There are several directives, which can be used to compile selective portions of your program's source code. This process is called conditional compilation. The conditional preprocessor construct is much like the 'if' selection structure. Consider the following preprocessor code:
#ifndef NULL #define NULL 0 #endif
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/* #define directive in C++ language */ #include <bits/stdc++.h> using namespace std; void func1(); void func2(); #pragma startup func1 #pragma exit func2 void func1() { cout << "Inside func1()\n"; } void func2() { cout << "Inside func2()\n"; } int main() { void func1(); void func2(); cout << "Inside main()\n"; return 0; }


This is a C++ Program code to check whether graph is DAG. In mathematics and computer science, a directed acyclic graph, is a directed graph with no directed cycles. It is formed by