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C++ Programming Code Examples

C++ > If Else and Switch Case Code Examples

If we write an entire if-else construct within either the body of the if statement or the body of an else statement.

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/* If we write an entire if-else construct within either the body of the if statement or the body of an else statement. This is called "nesting" of ifs. This is demonstrated as - */ if (expression1) statement; else { if (expression2) statement; else { block of statement; } }
Structures in C++ Language
In C++, classes and structs are blueprints that are used to create the instance of a class. Structs are used for lightweight objects such as Rectangle, color, Point, etc. Unlike class, structs in C++ are value type than reference type. It is useful if you have data that is not intended to be modified after creation of struct. C++ Structure is a collection of different data types. It is similar to the class that holds different types of data.
Syntax for Structures in C++
struct structureName{ member1; member2; member3; . . . memberN; };
A structure is declared by preceding the struct keyword followed by the identifier(structure name). Inside the curly braces, we can declare the member variables of different types. Consider the following situation:
struct Teacher { char name[20]; int id; int age; }
In the above case, Teacher is a structure contains three variables name, id, and age. When the structure is declared, no memory is allocated. When the variable of a structure is created, then the memory is allocated. Let's understand this scenario. Structures in C++ can contain two types of members: • Data Member: These members are normal C++ variables. We can create a structure with variables of different data types in C++. • Member Functions: These members are normal C++ functions. Along with variables, we can also include functions inside a structure declaration. Structure variable can be defined as: Teacher s; Here, s is a structure variable of type Teacher. When the structure variable is created, the memory will be allocated. Teacher structure contains one char variable and two integer variable. Therefore, the memory for one char variable is 1 byte and two ints will be 2*4 = 8. The total memory occupied by the s variable is 9 byte. The variable of the structure can be accessed by simply using the instance of the structure followed by the dot (.) operator and then the field of the structure.
s.id = 4;
We are accessing the id field of the structure Teacher by using the dot(.) operator and assigns the value 4 to the id field. In C++, the struct keyword is optional before in declaration of a variable. In C, it is mandatory.
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/* Structure is a collection of variables of different data types under a single name. It is similar to a class in that, both holds a collecion of data of different data types. */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; struct Person { char name[50]; int age; float salary; }; int main() { Person p1; cout << "Enter Full name: "; cin.get(p1.name, 50); cout << "Enter age: "; cin >> p1.age; cout << "Enter salary: "; cin >> p1.salary; cout << "\nDisplaying Information." << endl; cout << "Name: " << p1.name << endl; cout <<"Age: " << p1.age << endl; cout << "Salary: " << p1.salary; return 0; }
If Else Statement in C++
In computer programming, we use the if statement to run a block code only when a certain condition is met. An if statement can be followed by an optional else statement, which executes when the boolean expression is false. There are three forms of if...else statements in C++: • if statement, • if...else statement, • if...else if...else statement,
Syntax for If Statement in C++
if (condition) { // body of if statement }
The if statement evaluates the condition inside the parentheses ( ). If the condition evaluates to true, the code inside the body of if is executed. If the condition evaluates to false, the code inside the body of if is skipped.
Syntax for If...Else Statement
if (condition) { // block of code if condition is true } else { // block of code if condition is false }
The if..else statement evaluates the condition inside the parenthesis. If the condition evaluates true, the code inside the body of if is executed, the code inside the body of else is skipped from execution. If the condition evaluates false, the code inside the body of else is executed, the code inside the body of if is skipped from execution. The if...else statement is used to execute a block of code among two alternatives. However, if we need to make a choice between more than two alternatives, we use the if...else if...else statement.
Syntax for If...Else...Else If Statement in C++
if (condition1) { // code block 1 } else if (condition2){ // code block 2 } else { // code block 3 }
• If condition1 evaluates to true, the code block 1 is executed. • If condition1 evaluates to false, then condition2 is evaluated. • If condition2 is true, the code block 2 is executed. • If condition2 is false, the code block 3 is executed. There can be more than one else if statement but only one if and else statements. In C/C++ if-else-if ladder helps user decide from among multiple options. The C/C++ if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the C else-if ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
Syntax for If Else If Ladder in C++
if (condition) statement 1; else if (condition) statement 2; . . else statement;
Working of the if-else-if ladder: 1. Control falls into the if block. 2. The flow jumps to Condition 1. 3. Condition is tested. If Condition yields true, goto Step 4. If Condition yields false, goto Step 5. 4. The present block is executed. Goto Step 7. 5. The flow jumps to Condition 2. If Condition yields true, goto step 4. If Condition yields false, goto Step 6. 6. The flow jumps to Condition 3. If Condition yields true, goto step 4. If Condition yields false, execute else block. Goto Step 7. 7. Exits the if-else-if ladder. • The if else ladder statement in C++ programming language is used to check set of conditions in sequence. • This is useful when we want to selectively executes one code block(out of many) based on certain conditions. • It allows us to check for multiple condition expressions and execute different code blocks for more than two conditions. • A condition expression is tested only when all previous if conditions in if-else ladder is false. • If any of the conditional expression evaluates to true, then it will execute the corresponding code block and exits whole if-else ladder.
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/* If Else Statement in C++ Language */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main () { // local variable declaration: int a = 100; // check the boolean condition if( a < 20 ) { // if condition is true then print the following cout << "a is less than 20;" << endl; } else { // if condition is false then print the following cout << "a is not less than 20;" << endl; } cout << "value of a is : " << a << endl; return 0; }
If Else If Ladder in C/C++
The if...else statement executes two different codes depending upon whether the test expression is true or false. Sometimes, a choice has to be made from more than 2 possibilities. The if...else ladder allows you to check between multiple test expressions and execute different statements. In C/C++ if-else-if ladder helps user decide from among multiple options. The C/C++ if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the C else-if ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
Syntax of if...else Ladder in C++
if (Condition1) { Statement1; } else if(Condition2) { Statement2; } . . . else if(ConditionN) { StatementN; } else { Default_Statement; }
In the above syntax of if-else-if, if the Condition1 is TRUE then the Statement1 will be executed and control goes to next statement in the program following if-else-if ladder. If Condition1 is FALSE then Condition2 will be checked, if Condition2 is TRUE then Statement2 will be executed and control goes to next statement in the program following if-else-if ladder. Similarly, if Condition2 is FALSE then next condition will be checked and the process continues. If all the conditions in the if-else-if ladder are evaluated to FALSE, then Default_Statement will be executed.
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/* write a C program which demonstrate use of if-else-if ladder statement */ /* Program to Print Day Names using Else If Ladder in C++*/ #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int day; cout << "Enter Day Number: "; cin >> day; cout << "Day is "; if (day == 1) cout << "Sunday" << endl; else if (day == 2) cout << "Monday" << endl; else if (day == 3) cout << "Tuesday" << endl; else if (day == 4) cout << "Wednesday" << endl; else if (day == 5) cout << "Thursday" << endl; else if (day == 6) cout << "Friday" << endl; else cout << "Saturday" << endl; return 0; }
Relational Operators in C++
A relational operator is used to check the relationship between two operands. C++ Relational Operators are used to relate or compare given operands. Relational operations are like checking if two operands are equal or not equal, greater or lesser, etc. Relational Operators are also called Comparison Operators. • == Is Equal To 4 == 9 gives us false • != Not Equal To 4 != 9 gives us true • > Greater Than 4 > 9 gives us false • < Less Than 4 < 9 gives us true • >= Greater Than or Equal To 4 >= 9 give us false • <= Less Than or Equal To 4 <= 9 gives us true
==
Equal To Operator (==) is used to compare both operands and returns 1 if both are equal or the same, and 0 represents the operands that are not equal. The equal to == operator returns true - if both the operands are equal or the same false - if the operands are unequal int x = 10; int y = 15; int z = 10; x == y // false x == z // true The relational operator == is not the same as the assignment operator =. The assignment operator = assigns a value to a variable, constant, array, or vector. It does not compare two operands.
!=
Not Equal To Operator (!=) is the opposite of the Equal To Operator and is represented as the (!=) operator. The Not Equal To Operator compares two operands and returns 1 if both operands are not the same; otherwise, it returns 0. The not equal to != operator returns true - if both operands are unequal false - if both operands are equal. int x = 10; int y = 15; int z = 10; x != y // true x != z // false
>
Greater than Operator (>) checks the value of the left operand is greater than the right operand, and if the statement is true, the operator is said to be the Greater Than Operator. The greater than > operator returns true - if the left operand is greater than the right false - if the left operand is less than the right int x = 10; int y = 15; x > y // false y > x // true
<
Less than Operator (<) is used to check whether the value of the left operand is less than the right operand, and if the statement is true, the operator is known as the Less than Operator. The less than operator < returns true - if the left operand is less than the right false - if the left operand is greater than right int x = 10; int y = 15; x < y // true y < x // false
>=
Greater than Equal To Operator (>=) checks whether the left operand's value is greater than or equal to the right operand. If the statement is true, the operator is said to be the Greater than Equal to Operator. The greater than or equal to >= operator returns true - if the left operand is either greater than or equal to the right false - if the left operand is less than the right int x = 10; int y = 15; int z = 10; x >= y // false y >= x // true z >= x // true
<=
Less than Equal To Operator (<=) checks whether the value of the left operand is less than or equal to the right operand, and if the statement is true, the operator is said to be the Less than Equal To Operator. The less than or equal to operator <= returns true - if the left operand is either less than or equal to the right false - if the left operand is greater than right int x = 10; int y = 15; x > y // false y > x // true
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/* Relational Operators are used for the comparison of the values of two operands. For example, checking if one operand is equal to the other operand or not, an operand is greater than the other operand or not, etc. Some of the relational operators are (==, >= , <= ). */ #include <iostream> using namespace std; main() { int a = 21; int b = 10; int c ; if( a == b ) { cout << "Line 1 - a is equal to b" << endl ; } else { cout << "Line 1 - a is not equal to b" << endl ; } if( a < b ) { cout << "Line 2 - a is less than b" << endl ; } else { cout << "Line 2 - a is not less than b" << endl ; } if( a > b ) { cout << "Line 3 - a is greater than b" << endl ; } else { cout << "Line 3 - a is not greater than b" << endl ; } /* Let's change the values of a and b */ a = 5; b = 20; if( a <= b ) { cout << "Line 4 - a is either less than \ or equal to b" << endl ; } if( b >= a ) { cout << "Line 5 - b is either greater than \ or equal to b" << endl ; } return 0; }
Comments in C++
The C++ comments are statements that are not executed by the compiler. The comments in C++ programming can be used to provide explanation of the code, variable, method or class. If we write comments on our code, it will be easier for us to understand the code in the future. Also, it will be easier for your fellow developers to understand the code. By the help of comments, you can hide the program code also. There are two types of comments in C++: • Single Line comment • Multi Line comment
Syntax for Single Line Comment in C++
/* This is a comment */
The single line comment starts with // (double slash).
Syntax for Multi Line Comment in C++
/* C++ comments can also * span multiple lines */
C++ multi line comment is used to comment multiple lines of code. It is surrounded by slash and asterisk (/* ..... */). Comments shouldn't be the substitute for a way to explain poorly written code in English. We should always write well-structured and self-explanatory code. And, then use comments.
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/* program to illustrate use comments in C++ language */ #include <ostream> using namespace std; int main() { int x = 11; // x is a variable cout<<x<<"\n"; /* declare and print variable in C++ */ int x = 35; cout<<x<<"\n"; // This is a comment cout << "Hello World!"; /* Multi-line Comments in C++ */ }


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